be public property

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Related to property: property tax, property room

be public property

To be widely known or discussed. Everyone in school is talking about what happened, so apparently my private life is public property now.
See also: public

be ˌpublic ˈproperty

be known or talked about by everyone: When you’re famous, you and your life suddenly become public property.
See also: public
References in classic literature ?
They have nothing of their own to secure and to fortify; their mission is to destroy all previous securities for, and insurances of, individual property.
The same necessity which secures the rights of person and property against the malignity or folly of the magistrate, determines the form and methods of governing, which are proper to each nation and to its habit of thought, and nowise transferable to other states of society.
On the other side, the conservative party, composed of the most moderate, able, and cultivated part of the population, is timid, and merely defensive of property. It vindicates no right, it aspires to no real good, it brands no crime, it proposes no generous policy; it does not build, nor write, nor cherish the arts, nor foster religion, nor establish schools, nor encourage science, nor emancipate the slave, nor befriend the poor, or the Indian, or the immigrant.
This truth and justice men presently endeavor to make application of to the measuring of land, the apportionment of service, the protection of life and property. Their first endeavors, no doubt, are very awkward.
It promises a recognition of higher rights than those of personal freedom, or the security of property. A man has a right to be employed, to be trusted, to be loved, to be revered.
A rage for paper money, for an abolition of debts, for an equal division of property, or for any other improper or wicked project, will be less apt to pervade the whole body of the Union than a particular member of it; in the same proportion as such a malady is more likely to taint a particular county or district, than an entire State.
But it may be asked how Individualism, which is now more or less dependent on the existence of private property for its development, will benefit by the abolition of such private property.
For the recognition of private property has really harmed Individualism, and obscured it, by confusing a man with what he possesses.
Private property has crushed true Individualism, and set up an Individualism that is false.
With the abolition of private property, then, we shall have true, beautiful, healthy Individualism.
Jesus moved in a community that allowed the accumulation of private property just as ours does, and the gospel that he preached was not that in such a community it is an advantage for a man to live on scanty, unwholesome food, to wear ragged, unwholesome clothes, to sleep in horrid, unwholesome dwellings, and a disadvantage for a man to live under healthy, pleasant, and decent conditions.
With the abolition of private property, marriage in its present form must disappear.
When private property is abolished there will be no necessity for crime, no demand for it; it will cease to exist.
This, however, is, of course, the result of our property system and our system of competition.
There he is one maimed and marred; one who is not comely to look on, because Beauty is a joy; one who is not in fair raiment, because that may be a joy also: he is a beggar who has a marvellous soul; he is a leper whose soul is divine; he needs neither property nor health; he is a God realising his perfection through pain.
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