proper

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good and proper

1. Appropriate and acceptable, often socially. Don't cancel your meeting with him at the last minute—that's not good and proper behavior.
2. With intensity. Mom scolded me good and proper after I ignored my chores yet again.
See also: and, good, proper

prim and proper

Having very traditional, morally conservative beliefs and behavior. I've never dated someone who is so prim and proper before. I'm not sure how he's going react when he meets my family! She's so prim and proper that I bet she's never even jaywalked before.
See also: and, proper

go through (the proper) channels

To take the correct or accepted steps toward achieving some goal or outcome. I'm sorry, but we can't approve of this request because you didn't go through the proper channels. If you went through channels, then they have no reason to turn you away.
See also: channel, go, through

prim and ˈproper

(of a person) very correctly behaved and easily shocked by anything that is rude: Don’t invite her to the party. She’s so prim and proper.
See also: and, proper

ˌgood and ˈproper

(British English, spoken) completely; thoroughly: That’s messed things up good and proper.
See also: and, good, proper
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, an equivalent definition of properness is: [for all]w, y, [??]: Eu(w + [??]) [less than or equal to] u(w) implies
Another semantic facet of the term that links up with the notion of properness is that of accuracy (example 28), which springs from the reading exactly (example 29), also present since Old English times and related to other terms within the broader onomasiological picture.
Significantly, counterinsurgency operations demand a double assessment of civilian casualties and civilian property damage because of the focus on provision of safety and security to the local population and because the "properness" of military action must be evaluated differently.
The following properness constraints must be satisfied: [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] = 1.
What have been regarded as formal devices for signalling "name-hood", "properness", and so on, are part of a language's derivational morphology.
We now state a formal definition of properness, following Bailey (1973).
Three points should be discussed here: cost, properness and availability.
Marriage is to guarantee not only manly dignity, but also properness, propriety, and essentiality.
Its properness meant that--now and again--she could, perfectly properly, invite their daughter to visit her in the evening to discuss her poetry-writing (Caroline had won the headmistress's Prize for Poetry in her last year at school).
But in Uncivilised, Beatrice has a more missionary-like properness. Apart from the scene in which she is under the influence of Pituri, Beatrice comports herself within a framework of respectability.
Understanding how display features and eye movement characteristics are related to search time in visual search tasks would allow one to evaluate the properness of the display layout or format using eye movement characteristics.
"Maybe because I was born in freedom and raised in a household of properness and had a good, solid education in many disciplines, it did not occur to me that I would ever be considered less valuable than anyone else or discriminated against simply because I was a displaced victim of war.
Due to the damages of buildings and infrastructures, these facilities need to be evaluated for future use and properness. This will take time before they can be reutilised.
(13) Royle defines "the uncanny [as] a crisis of the proper: it entails a critical disturbance of what is proper (from the Latin proprius, 'own'), a disturbance of the very idea of personal or private property including the properness of proper names, one's so-called 'own' name, but also the proper names of others, of places, institutions and events.