prob


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms.
Related to prob: progressive

no problem

1. noun Not something difficult to handle or deal with; not a problem or difficulty. The repair should be no problem—just replace the belt and that's it. Picking you up was no problem. Don't even mention it.
2. expression That is not a problem; don't worry about it. A: "It looks like the file was deleted when the computer crashed." B: "No problem, there should be a backup copy."
3. expression I would be happy to. A: "Would you mind emptying the dishwasher for me?" B: "Sure, no problem."
See also: no, problem

no prob

1. noun Not something difficult to handle or deal with; not a problem or difficulty. A shortening of "no problem." The repair should be no prob—just replace the belt and that's it.
2. expression That is not a problem; don't worry about it. A: "It looks like the file was deleted when the computer crashed." B: "No prob, there should be a backup copy."
3. expression I would be happy to. A: "Would you mind emptying the dishwasher for me?" B: "Sure, no prob."
See also: no, prob

(that causes) no problem

That will not cause a problem for me or anyone else. (No problem is informal.) Mary: Do you mind waiting for just a little while? Bob: No problem. Sue: Does this block your light? Can you still read? Jane: That causes no problem.
See also: no, problem

no problem

1. Also, no sweat; not to worry. There's no difficulty about this, don't concern yourself. For example, Of course I can change your tire-no problem, or You want more small change? no sweat, or We'll be there in plenty of time, not to worry. The first of these colloquial terms dates from about 1960 and the second from about 1950. The third, originating in Britain in the 1930s and using not to with the sense of "don't," crossed the Atlantic in the 1970s.
2. You're welcome, as in Thanks for the ride, Dad.-No problem. [Late 1900s]
See also: no, problem

no problem

used to express agreement or acquiescence.
See also: no, problem

no ˈproblem

(spoken, informal)
1 (also not a ˈproblem) used for saying that you can do something or are happy to do something for somebody: ‘Can you be here at 7.30 tomorrow morning?’ ‘No problem.’
2 used after somebody has thanked you or said they are sorry for something: ‘Thanks for the ride.’ ‘No problem.’
See also: no, problem

No problem

1. and No prob and NP phr. All is well.; There is no problem, so don’t worry or fret. (Often said after someone else says I’m sorry.) No problem. I can do it easily. A: Gee! I’m sorry! B: No prob.
2. phr. you are welcome. (Sometimes said after someone else says thank you.) A: Thanks a lot. B: No problem.
See also: no, problem

No prob

verb
See also: no, prob

prob

mod. problem. No prob!

no problem

1. Used to express confirmation of or compliance with a request.
2. Used to acknowledge an expression of gratitude.
See also: no, problem

no problem

That’s fine; you’re welcome; I’d be glad to help. This conventional reply expressing acquiescence and other positive feelings originated in America in the mid-twentieth century. It also has taken hold in numerous parts of the non-English-speaking world; the author has heard it in France, Austria, Yugoslavia, and Singapore from individuals who otherwise knew almost no English (other than “okay”). Others report having heard it in Russia, where it is often used ironically, Kenya, and China. In Australia, however, it alternates with no worries (probably from the 1930s British locution, not to worry). The journal American Speech recorded “no problem” in 1963 as an equivalent of no sweat. The OED’s citations include Martin Amis’s Rachel Papers (1973): “He . . . gave it back to me, saying ‘No problem’ again through his nose.” It has quickly become as ubiquitous and as divorced from the words’ original meaning (i.e., “there is no difficulty”) as have a nice day and take care. Indeed, Pico Iyer pointed out that today “ ‘No problem’ . . . in every language means that your problems are just beginning” (Time, July 2, 1990).
See also: no, problem
References in periodicals archive ?
Elijah Wood probs shouldn't have kids, as he's clearly terrified of the little darlings.
Former bandmate Oritse Williams, 27, tweeted: "JB is probs the only groom you'll ever see in a du-rag at breakfast the morning of his wedding
Alas, the possibility of free 1D tickets for life - was probs wasted on the burly roadside recovery man who drove him home.
With school in the background, some of your buds' probs may be rising to the surface, So be the great gal you are and let your pals lean on ya.
Haz probs won't kick up a fuss - he's now rumoured to be loved-up with Kim Kardashian's little sis Kendall Jenner (who'll probs be hanging out with Niall about this time next year).
TBF, Princeton's so young he probs wouldn't know if he was in Miami or Milton Keynes.
If it didn't work for Madonna, it probs won't work for you, Ems.
Don't worry, Rylan, at this rate James probs doesn't have many other takers.