prince

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Hamlet without the prince

An event that happens despite the absence of a key player. Hamlet, the titular character of Shakespeare's play, is the prince of Denmark. The phrase originated from this very occurrence: a performance of Hamlet that took place without the actor who was to play Hamlet. Oh, we couldn't have a party without you—that would be like Hamlet without the prince!
See also: prince, without

live like a king

To have a luxurious lifestyle, in which one's every need or desire is satisfied. Typically said of or by a man. The pirate retired with so many riches that he lived like a king for the rest of his years, purchasing every comfort he could imagine. The cost of living is so much lower in Spain that we could live like kings ther.
See also: king, like, live

Prince Albert

slang A genital piercing through the underside of the glans penis (the head of the penis). When he told me what a Prince Albert was, a shudder went all the way up my spine. My boyfriend really wants to get a Prince Albert for his birthday.
See also: prince

Prince Charming

The (hypothetical) perfect man who has all of the traits that one (usually a woman) wants in a romantic partner. I'd almost given up hope of ever finding my own Prince Charming before I met you!
See also: charming, prince

prince of the blood

noun Someone, especially a male, with direct hereditary lineage to a monarch. Being a prince of the blood, he knew his actions and behavior would be scrutinized at every stage of his life. The police said they would not investigate a prince of the blood under any circumstances.
See also: blood, of, prince
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

live like a king

Also, live like a prince. Enjoy a lavish style of living, as in He spared no expense, preferring to live like a king as long as he could, or Since they got their inheritance, the Andersons are living like princes. This expression continues to be used despite the much smaller role royalty plays in the present day. [Mid-1500s]
See also: king, like, live
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

live like a king

If someone lives like a king, they have a very luxurious lifestyle. Although he lives like a king, he manages it without causing resentment. Company executives lived like kings and were paid millions of dollars each.
See also: king, like, live
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

Hamlet without the prince

a performance or event taking place without the principal actor.
The phrase comes from an account given in the Morning Post of September 1775 . The member of a theatrical company who was to play Hamlet in a production of Shakespeare's play ran off with an innkeeper's daughter before the performance; when the play was announced to the audience, they were told ‘the part of Hamlet [was] to be left out, for that night’.
See also: prince, without

prince (or princess) of the blood

a man (or woman) who is a prince (or princess) by right of their royal descent.
See also: blood, of, prince
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

live like a ˈking

live in very comfortable surroundings, enjoying all the advantages of being rich: In this luxury resort, you can live like a king.One day we’ll be rich, and you and I will live like kings.
See also: king, like, live

ˌPrince ˈCharming

(usually humorous) a man who seems to be a perfect boyfriend or husband because he is attractive, kind, etc: I’m still waiting for my Prince Charming!
This expression refers to a character in fairy tales such as Cinderella.
See also: charming, prince
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

Prince Albert

n. cannabis in general, especially marijuana sold or transported in a Prince Albert pipe tobacco can. (From the 1960s, but still heard.) Where can I get a can of Prince Albert?
See also: prince
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

live like a prince, to

To live extremely well, in lavish circumstances. This simile dates from the sixteenth century and has somehow outlived the days when royalty was preeminent in wealth and position. It is still used just as Samuel Pepys did in his Diary in 1660: “We came to Sir W. Batten’s, where he lives like a prince.”
See also: like, live
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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