primrose

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Related to primroses: English primrose

the primrose path

A life of pleasure and leisure that results in a negative or detrimental outcome. Usually used in the phrase "lead (one) down the primrose path." After winning the lottery, Jake found himself surrounded by people trying to lead him down the primrose path for their own benefit.
See also: path, primrose

primrose path

Fig. earthly delights that come to an end. She led him down the primrose path until she got tired of him.
See also: path, primrose

the primrose path

the pursuit of pleasure, especially when it is seen to bring disastrous consequences.
The allusion here is to ‘the primrose path of dalliance’ to which Ophelia refers in Hamlet.
See also: path, primrose

the primrose ˈpath (to ruin, destruction, etc.)

(literary) an easy life that is full of pleasure but that causes you harm in the end: If we followed your advice we’d all be walking down the primrose path to ruin.This phrase comes from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet.
See also: path, primrose
References in periodicals archive ?
THE delicate and humble primrose which sits in the shade at the feet of towering trees in Welsh woods has beaten the nation's emblem - the daffodil - to become our favourite wildflower in a new survey.
Take a few seed pods from your primroses when they are fat but stillgreen, tear back the outside casing of the old calyx, then burst the membrane with your nail and squeeze to expose seeds.
The New England Primrose Show runs from noon to 5 p.
Although similar in appearance there is a technical difference between primroses and polyanthus; the former produce a rosette of individual flowers from the plant base; the latter have stout stems and florets are in a cluster at the stalk top.
Primroses, which are cyclamen relatives, are also perennial plants.
This species and other invasive water primroses are weeds that can crowd out native plants.
Sadly though, wild primroses are not nearly as plentiful as they once were, but if we include them in our gardens we can help to increase their numbers.
English primroses (Primula x polyantha) are noted for the brilliant, jewel-tone colors of their flowers, which come in almost any color including blue, yellow, deep pink, and rich lipstick red.
Take a few seed pods from your primroses when they are fat but still green, tear back the outside casing of the old calyx, then burst the membrane with your nail and squeeze to expose seeds.
No doubt wild primroses have found their way into gardens from the very first time plots were set aside to cultivate food and, though they can be eaten and drunk - primrose wine must be a delicacy - it is for the joy they bring to spirit and soul that they are prized.
If you have a well-established patch of them in your garden, why not spread a little happiness to your neighbours and friends after your primroses have finished flowering this spring.
Cyclamen are also more long-lasting than primroses and should continue blooming until March or April.