pried


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pry out

1. Literally, to extract or remove something from something else with great force, especially with the use of a lever. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pry" and "out." I had to pry out all the rusty nails with the claw end of a hammer before we could begin repairing the damage to the fence. The sheriff pried the gun out of the suspect's hands.
2. To obtain or extract something, especially information, from someone with great effort, difficulty, or persistence. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pry" and "out." I had to pry the answer out of her when I asked where she had been. It was only after the judge threatened to charge him with contempt of court that his testimony was pried out of him.
See also: out, pry

pry around

1. To snoop around (some area) with the intent of uncovering secret or private information. There's been a drone in the sky prying around our property for the last couple of days. I'm going to call the cops if I see it again. There are constantly people prying around online, looking for a chance to sell or take control of your private data.
2. To attempt to use a lever around the edge of something to force it open. I had to pry around the edge of the phones screen before I could lift it off without damaging it. We pried around the top of the crate with crowbars to get it open.
See also: around, pry

pry out of

1. Literally, to remove something out of some place or thing with the force of a lever. A noun or pronoun is used between "pry" and "out of." I tried to pry the bolts out of the panel with a crowbar, but they wouldn't budge. We'll have to pry the rocks out of the opening to the pipe in order to stop the drainage ditch from overflowing again.
2. To compel someone to turn over some piece of information; to obtain some information from someone with great force or difficulty. A noun or pronoun is used between "pry" and "out of." I finally pried an apology out of Sarah for what she had done. The cops have been trying to pry the location of the gang's hideout out of the thug they arrested.
See also: of, out, pry

pry from

1. Literally, to remove something from some place or thing with the force of a lever. A noun or pronoun is used between "pry" and "from." I tried to pry the bolts from the panel with a crowbar, but they wouldn't budge. We'll have to pry the boards from the front door to get inside the house.
2. To compel someone to turn over some piece of information; to obtain some information from someone with great force or difficulty. A noun or pronoun is used between "pry" and "from." I finally pried an apology from Sarah for what she had done. The cops have been trying to pry the location of the gang's hideout from the thug they arrested.
3. To manage to compel someone or oneself to leave or stop looking at something with great force or difficulty. A noun or pronoun is used between "pry" and "from." It's getting harder and harder to pry the kids from their gadgets these days. Our parents had to pry us from the waterpark when it was time to go home. I'm finding I have to pry myself from my phone when I'm going to bed.
4. To manage to take something away from someone or compel them to stop paying attention to something with great force or difficulty. A noun or pronoun is used between "pry" and "from." I have to pry the phone from my wife whenever we sit down to eat dinner together. I'm tired of prying your video games from you every single weekend, so they're going to be off-limits for the next few weeks.
See also: pry

pry into (something)

1. To force entry into something using a lever of some kind. I pried into the crate to see what they were hiding inside. We'll never be able to pry into the safe—we'll need to drill through the lock!
2. To inquire closely and impertinently into something, especially that which is private, secret, or restricted. I wish you would stop prying into my business affairs. It's become very profitable for companies to advertise directly to people online by prying into their browsing habits.
See also: pry

pry off

1. Literally, to remove something from some surface with the force of a lever. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pry" and "off." I tried to pry the bolts off this panel with a crowbar, but they wouldn't budge. We'll have to pry off the pieces that have become fused to the dashboard.
2. By extension, to separate someone from someone else with the use of great physical force. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pry" and "off." Jake and Elsa were being so gross kissing in the hallway like that, so I went over and pried him off her. I had to go over and pry off fans as the movie star made his way to his car.
See also: off, pry

pry off of

1. Literally, to remove something from some surface with the force of a lever. A noun or pronoun is used between "pry" and "off." I tried to pry the bolts off of this panel with a crowbar, but they wouldn't budge. Several pieces have become fused to the dashboard—we'll have to pry them off of it.
2. By extension, to separate someone from someone else with the use of great physical force. A noun or pronoun is used between "pry" and "off." Jake and Elsa were being so gross kissing in the hallway like that, so I went over and pried him off of her. I had to go over and pry fans off of the movie star as he made his way to his car.
See also: of, off, pry

pry up

To raise something upward with the force of a lever in order to remove, open, or look beneath it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pry" and "up." The top of the crate is nailed shut, so we'll have to pry it up. Let's pry up these old floorboards so we can replace them with new ones.
See also: pry, up

pry around

to sneak or prowl around looking for something. Why are you prying around? Mind your own business! Please don't pry around. You might find out something you don't want to know.
See also: around, pry

pry something from someone

 and pry something out of someone
to work information out of someone; to force someone to reveal information. I couldn't even pry her name from her. The police tried to pry the name of the killer out of Max.
See also: pry

pry something from something

 and pry something out (of something)
to remove something from something with or as if with a lever. See if you can pry this wedge from its slot. I pried the rotted board out of the side of the house.
See also: pry

pry something off (of) something

 and pry something off
to use a lever to get something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Tom pried the top off the jelly jar. He pried off the jar top.
See also: off, pry

pry something out

(of something) Go to pry something from something.
See also: out, pry

pry something up

to raise something with or as with a lever. See if you can pry that trapdoor up. Pry up that lid.
See also: pry, up

pry out

v.
1. To extract something with or as if with a lever: I pried out the staples from the thick report. They pried the microphone out of my hands to stop me from singing.
2. To obtain something from someone with effort or difficulty: The detectives finally pried a confession out of the suspect. They kept questioning me until they had pried out all the information.
See also: out, pry
References in periodicals archive ?
When the bottommost section of flooring was exposed, the remaining tongue and groove flooring was pried from the sub floor, inspected for quality and sorted accordingly.
Monday, when someone pried open the front door of Hovy's Hair Salon at the Colorado Crossroads Mini Mall in the 1400 block of East Colorado Street.
Verdugo Road, the front door was pried open as well, and $2,000 in cash was stolen.
One boy told deputies that they had pried open the flanges on the school doors with a monkey wrench before popping the lock with a screwdriver.
Webb said Stephens was pried out of her vehicle and airlifted to Simi Valley Hospital.
Investigators said Teasley stole jewelry from the store, pried the gems from their mountings and sold some of the loose stones back to his unwitting boss and area pawnshops.