pretend to (something)

(redirected from pretends to)

pretend to (something)

To feign or claim to have some quality, skill, or characteristic. Jonathan pretends to the palate of a connoisseur, but really he's just pretentious. I like to write, but couldn't pretend to the kind of talent she has.
See also: pretend

pretend to something

to claim to have a skill or quality. I can hardly pretend to the artistry that Wally has, but I can play the piano a bit. I can't pretend to that level of skill.
See also: pretend
References in classic literature ?
They have real glasses and real wine of three kinds, namely, blackthorn wine, berberris wine, and cowslip wine, and the Queen pours out, but the bottles are so heavy that she just pretends to pour out.
He pretends to be able to shoot and succeeds only in hitting one of his friends.
(David pretends to pour from the blender into the cup he is holding and drinks from it.)
Pop stars pretend to be singers; Ricky Gervais pretends to be funny, but he doesn't make me laugh.
But it's a bit scary when one pretends to be a pilot.
DENISE Van Outen pretends to be Baywatch babe Pamela Anderson on the beach, she has revealed.
Volcker's 219-page report pretends to present the results of a no-holds-barred investigation of the multi-billion dollar UN scandal.
CHAMPAGNE: Brambles on TV; BOOZE SNOOZE: Jackie pretends to sleep it off on GMTV yesterday morning but the prank backfired; GOLDEN GIRL: Jackie clutches her champers; GIGGLY GIRL: The presenter acts all sozzled; NIGGLY GIRL: She tries to hang on to her bottle; HALF-BAKED GIRL: Jackie's cake for the anniversary
While his grandfather, Robert Burdick, washes his pickup truck at McKenzie Fire and Rescue's Holeman Station, 7-year-old Daniel Burdick pretends to take one of the fire district's pumper trucks for a spin as it sits in the bay of the station at Nimrod.
He pretends to believe me, which is one of the nice things about Dad.
Sister JoBeth plays her stupid guitar, and I have to go because my sister bangs the tambourine and pretends to sing.
Like the old Soviet economy, the new Russian one pretends to be larger and stronger than it is.
Like Samuel Richardson, Chamoiseau evokes a divided community of talkers, in which some are incomprehensible to others, or one group pretends not to understand another (or pretends to understand another).
In their totality, these conditions call to mind the facetious Cold War aphorism that under communism the workers pretend to work and the state pretends to pay them.
I use the word irony here in its classical sense of disguise and inversion, by which the narrator pretends to a point of view on the material under discussion different from the one he actually holds and by which he counts on the reader to make the correction and arrive at the correct understanding of his real meaning.