press (the) flesh

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press (the) flesh

To meet, talk to, and shake hands with many different people. Used especially in reference to a politician running for office. There's no way you'll win the election if you aren't out pressing the flesh among your constituents. I've always been something of a germophobe, so I don't like pressing flesh with strangers.
See also: flesh, press

press (the) flesh

Sl. to shake hands. Hey, chum! Glad to press flesh with you! He wanted to press the flesh, but I refused even to touch him.
See also: flesh, press

press the flesh

Shake hands and mingle with people, especially when running for public office. For example, The candidate went through the crowd, pressing the flesh. [1920s]
See also: flesh, press

press the flesh

JOURNALISM
COMMON To press the flesh means to talk to people in a crowd and shake their hands. She was out and about all over Galway, pressing the flesh. Note: This expression is often used about politicians, who do this when they are trying to get elected.
See also: flesh, press

press (the) flesh

(of a celebrity or politician) greet people by shaking hands. informal, chiefly North American
2000 New Yorker Clinton seemed…a figure from the past—a politician made to press the flesh, to give speeches in large halls and negotiate with his opponents in small rooms.
See also: flesh, press

ˌpress (the) ˈflesh

(of a famous person or a politician) shake hands with members of the public, especially in order to persuade them to vote for you: The presidential candidates were out on the streets again today, smiling for the cameras and pressing the flesh.
See also: flesh, press

press flesh

verb
See also: flesh, press

press (the) flesh

tv. to shake hands. (see also flesh-presser.) He wanted to press the flesh, but I refused even to touch him.
See also: flesh, press

press the flesh

Informal
To shake hands and mingle with many people, especially while campaigning for public office.
See also: flesh, press
References in periodicals archive ?
Just a few yards up the street, Conservative candidate Nigel Hastilow, flanked by his agents, pressed the flesh with anyone who would stop and talk.
Wearing out several pairs of shoes, she canvassed different neighborhoods and pressed the flesh with black Philadelphians--blue-collar workers, professionals and entrepreneurs--anyone who would take a few minutes to listen.
He did show up to give his standard speech, pressed the flesh for a few minutes near the stage, then left.
During the Super Bowl he pressed the flesh in the neighborhood bars; on Valentine's Day he played the piano in homes for the elderly.
JAMIE GAVE a very gracious speech and Bill Danforth tussled with security as he tried to mount the stage amidst cries of, "We won, 'cause we had the most fun!" Everyone jammed down to the basement where Jake pressed the flesh, Tommy wrestled all comers, and the Mystery Guests met their eager, grown-up fans.
The actor and gorgeous Penelope Cruz waved and pressed the flesh as they arrived for the premiere of their new movie, Vanilla Sky.