press the flesh


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press (the) flesh

To meet, talk to, and shake hands with many different people. Used especially in reference to a politician running for office. There's no way you'll win the election if you aren't out pressing the flesh among your constituents. I've always been something of a germophobe, so I don't like pressing flesh with strangers.
See also: flesh, press

press the flesh

Shake hands and mingle with people, especially when running for public office. For example, The candidate went through the crowd, pressing the flesh. [1920s]
See also: flesh, press

press the flesh

JOURNALISM
COMMON To press the flesh means to talk to people in a crowd and shake their hands. She was out and about all over Galway, pressing the flesh. Note: This expression is often used about politicians, who do this when they are trying to get elected.
See also: flesh, press

press (the) flesh

tv. to shake hands. (see also flesh-presser.) He wanted to press the flesh, but I refused even to touch him.
See also: flesh, press

press the flesh

Informal
To shake hands and mingle with many people, especially while campaigning for public office.
See also: flesh, press

press the flesh, to

To shake hands, to make physical contact in greeting someone. This humorous bit of American slang dates from the 1920s. It was first used, and still often is, of politicians who are greeting as many potential voters as possible in an effort to secure their votes.
See also: press
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of the songs on this Live and Love show were extended, giving her the chance to 'press the flesh' with members of the audience and invite fans to dance and sing with her.
The great and the good of LA stopped in for the W Magazine bash in California to press the flesh of potential winners.
She doesn't need to press the flesh or beg us to buy poppies.
Disney, for example, took over the El Capitan May 19 to screen trailers of its new shows, and managed to entice an impressive lineup of cast members--from Ben Affleck and Gregory Hines to Eric Roberts and Bonnie Hunt--to press the flesh. Jim Belushi, who already fronts a Disney sitcom, performed at the theater; Tom Jones regaled the 600 guests at the party in the Kodak Building.
Taoiseach Ahern - who HATES travelling by helicopter - was picked up in Dublin and flown to Letterkenny to press the flesh with voters.
Always one of our more tactile performers, he wasted few opportunities to press the flesh with the audience packed in and around the huge heart- shaped boardwalk surrounding the stage - and twice he hared round that steeply banked track in a very passable imitation of Michael Johnson.
And so she takes her super-powered sexy self from video shoots and arena stages to press the flesh and broker deals with businessmen and politicians.
He says he likes to get out and about and you can't blame him for wanting to press the flesh and meet his people.
Whatever she was thinking, she looked more like she was about to attack Rorke's Drift than press the flesh with her fashion pals.
HOTTING UP: William Hague and Ffion press the flesh at Stoneleigh yesterday, while Tony Blair was given a rough ride by Sharon Storer (left), the partner of a cancer patient as he arrived at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham.
The primary value in the get-togethers is to provide opportunity to press the flesh and to eat and drink to excess.
While the assembled actors queued up to press the flesh, Philip blithely told them he'd never watched the soap because it was on at "an inconvenient time".
Fresh fish should be slightly slimy, the skin should be firm and when you press the flesh it should be springy and not leave a dent where you pressed it.
He'll also be appearing back over the Border when he turns up at the Scottish Motorcycle Show at Ingliston on March 7 and 8, so you can press the flesh and speak to the man who is earning himself a permanent place in the Guinness Book of Records.
Which is why the politicians' mantra about how they've taken to the streets to press the flesh of Britain's "real people" is a sick joke.