premium

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Related to premiums: Insurance Premiums

at a premium

1. For an expensive price (typically because the item in question is hard to find). If you don't go Christmas shopping early, you'll only get the most popular toys at a premium later.
2. Difficult to obtain. Quiet moments are at a premium when there's a toddler in the house.
See also: premium

place a premium on (something)

1. To greatly increase the cost or scarcity of something. Because the city is so densely populated, landlords are able to place a premium on rented accommodation.
2. To place an especially high value on something; to consider something more important or valuable than is usual. We always place a premium on our customer service support, so never hesitate to contact us if you have a problem! With three young children, I place a premium on a shop where I can find everything I need in one stop.
See also: on, place, premium

put a premium on (something)

1. To greatly increase the cost or scarcity of something. Because the city is so densely populated, landlords are able to put a premium on rented accommodation.
2. To place an especially high value on something; to consider something more important or valuable than is usual. We always put a premium on our customer service support, so never hesitate to contact us if you have a problem. With three young children, I put a premium on a shop where I can find everything I need in one stop.
See also: on, premium, put

at a premium

at a high price; priced high because of something special. Sally bought the shoes at a premium because they were of very high quality. This new sports car sells at a premium because so many people want to buy it.
See also: premium

place something at a premium

to force up the value of something so that its price is higher. The rapid changes in the market placed all the medical stocks at a premium. The goods had been placed at a premium by the changing market conditions.
See also: place, premium

put a premium on something

to make something harder or more expensive to obtain or do. The recent action of the bank directors put a premium on new home loans. The scarcity of steel put a premium on the cost of new cars.
See also: on, premium, put

put something at a premium

to make something available only at an extra cost or through extra effort. The scarcity of fresh vegetables at this time of year puts broccoli at a premium. The high demand for apples puts them at a premium.
See also: premium, put

at a premium

At a higher price than usual owing to scarcity; also, considered more valuable, held in high esteem. For example, Since that article came out, the firm's stock has been selling at a premium and Space is at a premium in most stores. This idiom uses premium in the sense of "bounty" or "bonus." [Mid-1800s] Also see put a premium on.
See also: premium

put a premium on

Value more highly than usual, as in Her employer put a premium on honesty and hard work. First recorded in 1907, this term is almost always used figuratively.
See also: on, premium, put

at a premium

1. If something is at a premium, it is not easily available and because of this it has a high value. Space is at a premium in central London stores, as you can imagine. You can pick these carrots in June, when good vegetables are at a premium.
2. If you buy or sell something at a premium, you sell it for a higher price than is usual for that thing. People want organic foods so I can sell my eggs at a premium.
See also: premium

put a premium on something

or

place a premium on something

If you put a premium on something or place a premium on it, you believe that it is very important or valuable. Companies like these put a premium on training. I place a high premium on what someone is like as a person.
See also: on, premium, put, something

put (or place) a premium on

regard as or make particularly valuable or important.
1998 New Scientist Enormous forces would have acted upon the skull and neck, putting a premium on size and strength.
See also: on, premium, put

at a ˈpremium

having great value or importance; difficult or expensive to buy, find, obtain, etc: During a war, ordinary foods like bread or meat are often at a premium.Good mathematics teachers are always at a premium in this country.
See also: premium

put/place a ˈpremium on something

consider something very important or valuable: This company puts a high premium on the loyalty of its employees.
See also: on, place, premium, put, something

at a premium

More valuable than usual, as from scarcity: Fresh water was at a premium after the reservoir was contaminated.
See also: premium
References in periodicals archive ?
businesses should also be aware that if their foreign parent purchases insurance on their behalf from a foreign insurer, those premiums may also be subject to the FET.
The typical premium financing customer is a commercial insured that doesn't want to pay 100% of its property/casualty premiums at the inception date, in cases when an insurance company is not already offering a payment plan, he said.
However, the House did include a provision that would allow the PBGC the discretion to raise premiums by up to 20 percent per year during the five-year duration of the bill.
It is anticipated that such a premium will be imposed on all individuals earning more than $20,000 per year.
Just about 100 percent of newsletter renewal premiums are editorial.
If a split-dollar arrangement under the loan regime fails the test for sufficient interest or does not provide for interest, the premiums will be treated as a below-market loan.
If the captive mechanism is looked upon as a short-term marketplace solution, to be used only until insurance premiums drop below captive costs, success is unlikely.
You should determine upfront how much you can spend on premiums to make your campaign successful--if you spend too little, you might not see a boost in response; if you spend too much, you might lose your bottom line.
Because premiums are based in part on the danger level of a job, telling the state that a construction worker is a clerical worker can save an employer a lot of money.
Premiums for Blue Cross-Blue Shield increased less than Prudential's, but still outpaced Medicare inflation or Social Security cost-of-living adjustments in many states.
Townsend says most people drink super premiums because they have more flavor, more body and are more refined.
This, in turn, engenders a still greater incentive to leave the troubled fund or requires the payment of still higher premiums to support it.
With Workers' Compensation insurance premiums now whizzing through the stratosphere.
AIG), has introduced two new disability income riders--with no additional medical underwriting required--that can be added to American General Life's popular ROP Term (which returns all of the policy holder's premiums at the end of the policy term1) and LTG Ultra life insurance policies.
Unless clients self-insure by continuing to pay premiums beyond their life expectancy in an aggregate amount equal to the death benefit, their heirs will receive a windfall (especially if the insured dies prematurely).