prejudice

(redirected from prejudiced)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

terminate (someone) with extreme prejudice

To kill someone without hesitation, mercy, or discernment. The general warned the rebels that they must either surrender or be terminated with extreme prejudice. We must terminate these terrorists with extreme prejudice to ensure the safety of our country.

kill (someone) with extreme prejudice

To kill someone without hesitation, mercy, or discernment. The general warned the rebels that they must either surrender or be killed with extreme prejudice. We must kill these terrorists with extreme prejudice to ensure the safety of our country.
See also: extreme, kill, prejudice

without prejudice

1. Without any detriment to or waiver of an existing or inherent legal right or claim. A: "But didn't the judge already decided the case in our favor?" B: "No, he dismissed it, but without prejudice, so the other party has the right to open another lawsuit against us."
2. Of an offer, not to be admissible in a court of law, especially as an admission or liability or guilt. The company offered to settle out of court for $250,000 without prejudice for the accident.
See also: prejudice, without

prejudice someone or something against someone or something

to turn someone or a group against someone or something. I believe that the lawyer was trying to prejudice the jury against the defendant. The discussion about how calves are raised prejudiced me against eating veal.
See also: prejudice

terminate someone with extreme prejudice

murder or assassinate someone. euphemistic, chiefly US
The expression originated in the terminology of the Central Intelligence Agency in the 1970s.

without ˈprejudice (to something)

(law) without affecting any other legal matter: They agreed to pay compensation without prejudice (= without admitting guilt).
See also: prejudice, without
References in periodicals archive ?
The prejudiced attitude towards homosexuals was assessed on a scale proposed by Lacerda et al.
Many authors thus suggest that individualism inhibits prejudiced thought and behavior toward out-groups, while collectivism promotes them.
2 : to cause damage to (as a person's rights) <Newspaper stories prejudiced the upcoming trial.
Results showed that when perpetrators were African-American, explicitly egalitarian witnesses more often made incorrect identification decisions than racially prejudiced witnesses.
ONE in three Scots think it is acceptable to be prejudiced, a shock report revealed yesterday.
9100-3, because he acted reasonably and in good faith and the government's interests would not be prejudiced.
I have a very strong, old-fashioned view that if you are properly educated, it is almost impossible to be prejudiced.
may give rise to a covered Loss, provided, however, that the 120-day deadline for performance will be extended to the benefit of the defaulting party and to the detriment of the non-defaulting party for so long as the non-defaulting party is not appreciably prejudiced thereby.
For example, Ponterotto and Pedersen (1993) suggested that persons of color whose primary identification is with the White American culture are more likely to be racially prejudiced toward their own racial/ethnic group.
Carroo (1987) has suggested that highly prejudiced individuals would find it more difficult to recognize other-race faces because they focus on the race stereotype more than less prejudiced individuals, and tend to ignore individual differences among these faces.
To the prejudiced person reality is separateness, differences, incompatibility, dissonance.
When I would not eat it, there were a few comments about my being prejudiced.
At this point, people want to avoid conflict or the perception that they are prejudiced or overly angry.
Females, though generally less prejudiced, were particularly likely to treat Natives differently.