prefix (something) to (something else)

(redirected from prefixed to)

prefix (something) to (something else)

To attach a particular prefix to the beginning of a word. Confusingly, prefixing "in-" to "flammable" doesn't create a negative, which is what you would normally expect. You need to prefix something to it if you want to change it from a noun to a verb.
See also: prefix

prefix something to something

to place something at the beginning of a word or part of a word. If you prefix a re- to some verbs, you get an entirely different meaning. You can't prefix anything to some verbs.
See also: prefix
References in classic literature ?
* Dissertation on Romance and Minstrelsy, prefixed to Ritson's Ancient
Among other public buildings in a certain town, which for many reasons it will be prudent to refrain from mentioning, and to which I will assign no fictitious name, there is one anciently common to most towns, great or small: to wit, a workhouse; and in this workhouse was born; on a day and date which I need not trouble myself to repeat, inasmuch as it can be of no possible consequence to the reader, in this stage of the business at all events; the item of mortality whose name is prefixed to the head of this chapter.
The two former are expressly prohibited by the declarations prefixed to some of the State constitutions, and all of them are prohibited by the spirit and scope of these fundamental charters.
He looked like the darkly engraved portraits which we see prefixed to old volumes of sermons, and had no more right than one of those portraits would have to step forth, as he now did, and meddle with a question of human guilt, passion, and anguish.
To justify their zeal in this matter, they allege two things: one is that, though the constitution of New York has no bill of rights prefixed to it, yet it contains, in the body of it, various provisions in favor of particular privileges and rights, which, in substance amount to the same thing; the other is, that the Constitution adopts, in their full extent, the common and statute law of Great Britain, by which many other rights, not expressed in it, are equally secured.
Besides, the "de" which had been prefixed to his name, raised him to the rank of the person with whom he was conversing.
The couplet from Aeschylus which she prefixed to one of the chapters of 'Felix Holt' might stand at the outset of all her work:
His life was prefixed to all the early editions of these fables, and was republished as late as 1727 by Archdeacon Croxall as the introduction to his edition of Aesop.
According to the reports, the calling number display showed a "+" sign prefixed to the calling number of the fraudulent message.
These statements, implying that the use of the prefix was strictly confined to one form, appear to be an overgeneralisation when compared to Visser (1966: [section] 1126), who argues that this particular prefix "cannot be called a marker of the past participle form, since it was also prefixed to infinitives in Old and--under the forms [z.sup.e-], y- and i- --in early Middle English".
The most recent account of the prefix and its use with the verb in Middle English has been put forward by Iglesias-Rabade (2003:331), arguing that the prefix could convey the idea of a perfective action when prefixed to a verb and therefore usually appears in preterite participles, with the reservation that "some verbs are also prefixed by i-/y- in the present and preterite system".
When these consonantal person markers were prefixed to a verbal base beginning with a consonant, different intrusive vowels developed depending on the character of the prefix consonant, and not, as suggested by Testen, depending on the quality of the theme vowel of the verbal base.
According to two of the reports, the calling number display showed a "+" sign prefixed to the calling number of the fraudulent message.