predispose (someone or something) to (something)

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predispose (someone or something) to (something)

1. To make someone or something more inclined to some action in advance. Often used in passive constructions. Harvard's reputation for its law program predisposed him to go there after high school. I know Ruth is predisposed to do whatever her father suggests due to her overwhelming sense of loyalty to him.
2. To make someone or something more susceptible or liable to something. Often used in passive constructions. It's your mother's father who predisposes you to baldness, not your own father. My genetics predispose me to heart disease, so I take every precaution I can to avoid it. The economy was already predisposed to collapse due to the sudden removal of many regulations that kept it in balance.
See also: predispose, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

predispose someone or something to(ward) something

to make someone or something susceptible to something. Your comments will not predispose me toward a favorable treatment of your case. Do you think that this weather will predispose me to catching a cold?
See also: predispose, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Medical students have to indulge in a lot of curricular near work, probably predisposing them to development of myopia.
While grooming, cats often ingest hair that is shed, sometimes predisposing them to hairballs, or trichobezoars, which may cause problems in some cats.
Women who carry a genetic mutation predisposing them to breast cancer should rely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instead of mammography for their regular screenings, a new study suggests.
Among women with mutations predisposing them to breast cancer, however, those who develop the disease before they turn 40 are slightly more likely than the others to have had children, according to a new study.
The researchers hypothesized that differences in the gene's DNA sequence might alter the timing of a person's clock, predisposing them to morning or evening alertness.