predispose (someone or something) to (something)

(redirected from predispose them to)

predispose (someone or something) to (something)

1. To make someone or something more inclined to some action in advance. Often used in passive constructions. Harvard's reputation for its law program predisposed him to go there after high school. I know Ruth is predisposed to do whatever her father suggests due to her overwhelming sense of loyalty to him.
2. To make someone or something more susceptible or liable to something. Often used in passive constructions. It's your mother's father who predisposes you to baldness, not your own father. My genetics predispose me to heart disease, so I take every precaution I can to avoid it. The economy was already predisposed to collapse due to the sudden removal of many regulations that kept it in balance.
See also: predispose, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

predispose someone or something to(ward) something

to make someone or something susceptible to something. Your comments will not predispose me toward a favorable treatment of your case. Do you think that this weather will predispose me to catching a cold?
See also: predispose, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There are some people that are born with certain genes that predispose them to stroke.
Conversely, individuals with a genetic predisposition to drink high amounts of alcohol may not have the genes that predispose them to become dependent." (ANI)
Fifteen (52%) patients had underlying illnesses that were known to predispose them to V.
The researchers plan to examine potential effects of negative expectations more closely in pessimists, whose personalities may predispose them to pain sensitivity.
As Watson points out, people can handle the bad news associated with inheriting genes that predispose them to disease.
And, says Joseph Judd, supervisory research chemist at the center's Lipid Nutrition Laboratory, that should be good news for the estimated 25 million people in the United States whose mildly elevated blood pressure appears to predispose them to clinical hypertension (high blood pressure) -- a risk factor in heart disease, kidney disease and stroke.