precious

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precious few

adjective Not much; scant. (Used solely with plural countable nouns; "precious little" is used with uncountable nouns.) He's had precious few job offers since he got out of college. We've had precious few details about the deal, so rumors are flying around the office at the moment.
See also: few, precious

precious little

1. adjective Not much; scant. (Used solely with uncountable nouns; "precious few" is used with plural countable nouns.) There's precious little evidence connecting him to the crime, but the prosecution is adamant that he's their man. We've had precious little information about the deal, so rumors are flying around the office at the moment.
2. noun A very small amount (of something). We still know precious little about who might be involved with the attack. There's been precious little in the way of details about the trade deal being struck between the two countries.
See also: little, precious

time is money

Time is a valuable commodity, so we should be as quick or expeditious as possible. My dad was of the firm believe that time is money, so he never really liked to sit back, relax, and do nothing—he always needed some project to be working on. Come on, come on, time is money—tell me what you want already!
See also: money, time
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

precious few

 and precious little
very few; very little. (Few for people or things that can be counted, and little for amounts.) We get precious few tourists here in the winter. There's precious little food in the house and there is no money.
See also: few, precious

Time is money.

(My) time is valuable, so don't waste it. I can't afford to spend a lot of time standing here talking. Time is money, you know! People who keep saying time is money may be working too hard.
See also: money, time
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

precious few

Also, precious little. Very few, very little, as in There are precious few leaves left on the trees, or We have precious little fuel left. In these idioms precious serves as an intensive, a colloquial usage dating from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: few, precious

time is money

One's time is a valuable commodity, as in I can't stay home and wait any longer; time is money, you know. This proverbial term goes back to one first recorded in 1572, time is precious, in a discourse on usury.
See also: money, time
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

precious little

or

precious few

If you say that there is precious little of something, you mean that there is very little of it, and that it would be better if there were more. The banks have had precious little to celebrate recently. Note: Precious few is used before plural nouns with the same meaning. Precious few homebuyers will notice any reduction in their monthly repayments.
See also: little, precious
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

precious little (or few)

extremely little (or few).
See also: little, precious

time is money

time is a valuable resource, therefore it's better to do things as quickly as possible. proverb
The present form of the expression seems to originate in a speech made by Benjamin Franklin in 1748 , but the sentiment is much older. The saying ‘the most costly outlay is time’ is attributed to the 5th-century BC Athenian orator and politician Antiphon.
See also: money, time
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

precious ˈfew/ˈlittle

(informal) very few/little: There are precious few places round here where you can get good Indian food.
See also: few, little, precious

time is ˈmoney

(saying) time is valuable, and should not be wastedThis saying was first used by the American politician Benjamin Franklin in 1748.
See also: money, time
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

precious few

Hardly any. The use of precious for “very” or “extremely” dates from the first half of the nineteenth century, and so does its pairing with “few.” For some reason it is never paired with any other adjective; one never hears of “precious many.” A. Gray used it in a letter of 1839, “While on the Continent I have received precious few letters,” and Neville Chamberlain used it in a speech to the House of Commons (August 26, 1886): “Precious few of them have declared in favour of the bill.”
See also: few, precious

time is money

One’s time is a precious commodity. The sentiment for this phrase dates from ancient times, but the exact wording is most often attributed to Benjamin Franklin in his Advice to a Young Tradesman (1748): “Remember that time is money.” Charles Dickens elaborated on it in Nicholas Nickleby (1839): “Time is money . . . And very good money too to those who reckon interest by it.”
See also: money, time
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
People were not unclean; all people were God's children--and preciously loved by God.
In addition, Java viewers require a compatibility downgrade to match platform versions, leaving them exposed to preciously patched vulnerabilities.
Anthony Martial flitted between the dangerous and the dormant but his development is another preciously rare mark in the Van Gaal plus column.
The remaining part is kept preciously aside and will be used when a long-term acceptable solution will be found for Ponso."
Good was preciously working as SVP, IBW on an interim basis.
I never wanted to waste the preciously earned engineering degree by sitting idle at home.
A limping Tom Makinson also stopped Hall in full flight before giving way to his leg injury and second rower Carl Ablett went preciously close before, at the other end Leeds' full-back Hardaker hauled down Saints prop Kyle Amor when in sight of the line.
And Ensemble Inegal are so preciously musical that the listener never gets bored, even though the entire album is actually made up of music for the same instrumental setup (with the exception of the 13th track, in which two violins are replaced by three violas).
The subtractive process of ink removal to 'call up the ghosts', as it were, is preciously random.
[A]ll that prepares for human life and follows from it, therefore, ought to be preciously defended."--Michael J.
The dials are preciously set with peacock feathers and on one model the feathers are framed by 120 round-cut diamonds (approx.
It's also a truism that stories of sudden kindness or gratitude are exceedingly, preciously rare.
In his view, BDI should say why it never reacted preciously but used those fictitious votes to help itself and VMRO-DPMNE in many elections.
Down Under they do not get many knocks in their domestic game and treat each one preciously.
Issue number 4 sees the cooperation of my new editorial assistant, Edward Bowen, who has immediately been preciously useful, as all my editorial assistants in the past.