pray

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pray at the porcelain altar

slang To vomit into a toilet, especially as the result of drinking excessive amounts of alcohol. Doing so often requires one to kneel in front of or bend over the toilet (the "porcelain altar"), a position that is likened to kneeling during prayer. If Tommy doesn't stop drinking, he's going to be praying at the porcelain altar all night. The chemotherapy has had me praying at the porcelain altar throughout the day.
See also: altar, porcelain, pray

pray for

1. To utter a prayer to God or some other deity as an entreaty for the physical or spiritual wellbeing of someone. We've all been praying for you after the accident. Let us all bow our heads and pray for those unfortunate souls lost in the accident.
2. To utter a prayer to God or some other deity as an entreaty for something to happen or be granted. We've been praying for rain, but this drought is showing no sign of abating. I'll pray for a peaceful resolution to this conflict.
See also: pray

pray over (something)

To utter prayers to God or some other deity in order to receive guidance or solace about some issue. I've spent many nights praying over this, but I just can't find it in my heart to forgive you. If ever I'm in doubt about what to do, I find a quiet, peaceful place and pray over it.
See also: over, pray

pray tell

set phrase Please tell me (about something). Pray tell, will your lovely wife be accompanying you to the gala this evening? A: "Sir, we have received news of the king's response." B: "Pray tell!"
See also: pray, tell

pray to (someone or something)

To utter prayers to some deity, spiritual being, or object of worship. The tribe were all too busy praying to the statue in the middle of the village to notice us. The only thing to do at a time like this is pray to God or whomever, or whatever, you believe in.
See also: pray

pray to the enamel god

slang To vomit into a toilet, especially profusely or extensively. Doing so often requires one to kneel in front of or bend over the toilet (the "enamel god"), a position that is likened to kneeling before or bowing to a sacred idol. If Tommy doesn't stop drinking, he'll be praying to the enamel god all night. I don't think I've ever thrown up so much before. I hope I never have to pray to the enamel god again in my life.
See also: enamel, god, pray

pray to the porcelain god

slang To vomit into a toilet, especially profusely or extensively. Doing so often requires one to kneel in front of or bend over the toilet (the "porcelain god"), a position that is likened to kneeling before or bowing to a sacred idol. If Tommy doesn't stop drinking, he'll be praying to the porcelain god all night. I don't think I've ever thrown up so much before. I hope I never have to pray to the porcelain god again in my life.
See also: god, porcelain, pray

pray to the porcelain goddess

slang To vomit into a toilet, especially profusely or for a long period of time. If Tommy doesn't slow down on the vodka, he's going to be up praying to the porcelain goddess all night. Something the restaurant served us must have been spoiled, because everyone was praying to the porcelain goddess later that evening.
See also: goddess, porcelain, pray

the family that prays together stays together

Praying or engaging in other religious practices together as a group keeps a family unified (by helping it to avoid dysfunction, etc.). When I was growing up, my whole family always had to go to church together. My parents would say, "The family that prays together stays together."
See also: family, pray, stay, that, together

family that prays together stays together

Prov. Families who practice religion together will not break apart through divorce or estrangement. Mother believed that the family that prays together stays together and insisted that we all say prayers every night.
See also: family, pray, stay, that, together

pray for someone or something

 
1. to beseech God, or some other deity, on behalf of someone or something. I will pray for you to recover from your illness quickly. As the fire spread throughout the old church, the congregation prayed for its preservation.
2. to ask God, or some other deity, to grant something. The family prayed for David's safety. All the people prayed for peace.
See also: pray

pray over something

 
1. to say grace over a meal. Do you pray over your meals? We prayed over dinner just after we sat down to eat.
2. to seek divine guidance about something through prayer. I will have to think about it and pray over it awhile. I'll have an answer next week. She prayed over the problem for a while and felt she had a solution.
See also: over, pray

pray to someone or something

to utter prayers of praise or supplication to some divine or supernatural being or something. I pray to God that all this works out. The high priest prayed to the spirits of his ancestors that the rains would come.
See also: pray

pray to the porcelain god

Sl. to kneel at the toilet bowl and vomit from drunkenness. Wally spent a while praying to the porcelain god last night. I think I have to go pray to the porcelain god.
See also: god, porcelain, pray

pray to the porcelain god

and pray to the enamel god
in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. (Refers to being on one’s knees [praying] in front of a porcelain toilet bowl.) Wayne was in the john, praying to the enamel god.
See also: god, porcelain, pray

pray to the enamel god

verb
See also: enamel, god, pray
References in periodicals archive ?
To answer the research question how does frequency of prayer relate to various relationship outcomes, OLS (linear) regression or ordinal regression analysis (dependent on DV) was performed to search for differences among different groups of people and their praying practices; crosstabs were explored prior to regression analysis.
Praying is not something complicated that has to be taught by experts.
Come to think of it, praying to a God who doesn't exist is the least of my problems.
Another added: "Praying 4 u Wayne." And one more read: "We love you Wayne.
He uses sermons, magazines, diaries, and letters to reconstruct their emotional lives and theoretical writings from the behavioral and social sciences, literary theory, philosophy, gender studies, and theology to figure out what larger significance we might attach to a city filled suddenly with praying white men.
On the third day I let go of all that and started out by praying. Little by little the music started bubbling up, and in the end I had six pieces.' After the conference people came up to her to ask where they could get the music.
Let us return to the traditional blessing formula: "Barukh attah Adonai, elohenu melekh ha-olam, asher..." "Blessed be You, O Lord our God, sovereign of the universe, who...." Those praying address God in the second person as "You O Lord." This Lord is then referred to in the third person as the sovereign of the universe who does such-and-such, for example "who commanded us to do something" or "who creates the fruit of the vine." Critics have focused on two problems in this formula--grammatical mixture and gender--and tried to amend it with two radically different solutions.
A journalist assigned to the Jerusalem bureau had an apartment overlooking the Western Wall and every day when she looked out of her window, she saw an old bearded a Jew praying vigorously.
This is one of the worst things that could ever have been perpetrated, the idea of praying for victory.
"It strikes me that praying as part of a protest of a Supreme Court ruling is using prayer as a kind of weapon or an act of spiritual intimidation against those who dare to be something other than their brand of Christianity," said the Rev.
Fundamentalist Ernie is known for advocating rhetorical praying as evidence of his political virtue, instead of good works like providing food for the hungry, health care for children of poor parents, and adequate funds for inner-city public schools.
Acknowledging a thematic inspiration from two lines of Maya Angelou's overprized Clinton inaugural poem, Fagan typically used his personal response to four words--arriving, nightmare, praying, and dream--to create memorable, emotionally charged new movement.
HUMAN beings have been praying for as long as humanity has existed.
Jesus was praying in a certain place, and when he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, "Lord, teach us to pray just as John taught his disciples." He said to them, "When you pray, say:
We are praying for other things because even if we are silent, we are just waiting for the right opportunity),' he added.