praise

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sing the praises of (someone or something)

To speak very highly of someone or something; to enthusiastically endorse someone or something; to extol the virtues, benefits, or good qualities of someone or something. Our manager has been singing the praises of the new developers she hired. I just hope that they're up to the job! Jeff was singing the praises of his smartphone all last week, until it froze on him all of a sudden last night.
See also: of, praise, sing

praise from Sir Hubert

The most prestigious compliment one can receive. Derived from a line in the 1797 Thomas Morton play A Cure for the Heartache. The CEO actually commended you for your work on the project? Wow, that's praise from Sir Hubert indeed!
See also: praise, sir

praise the Lord, and pass the ammunition

Keep going, despite trouble or stress. The phrase is widely believed to have been said by a Navy chaplain during the attack on Pearl Harbor; it later became the title of a popular patriotic song. Until help comes, there's nothing we can do but keep trying to plug the holes in the roof. Praise the Lord, and pass the ammunition!
See also: ammunition, and, pass, praise

sing (someone's or something's) praises

To speak very highly of something or someone; to enthusiastically endorse someone or something; to extol the virtues, benefits, or good qualities of someone or something. Our manager has been singing the new developers' praises. I hope they're up to the job! Jeff sang his phone's praises right up until it froze on him all of a sudden last night.
See also: praise, sing

damn (someone or something) with faint praise

To criticize or undermine someone or something by showing a lack of enthusiasm. I needed you to support me in there! The committee probably won't approve of my research project now that you've damned it with faint praise.
See also: damn, faint, praise

praise (someone or something) to the skies

To heap lavish or excessive amounts of praise on someone or something. All the film critics have been praising her performance to the skies, but I thought it was a bit wooden, to be honest. Your previous boss praised you to the skies in his letter of recommendation, so we have high hopes for you here.
See also: praise, skies

damn someone or something with faint praise

Fig. to criticize someone or something indirectly by not praising enthusiastically. The critic did not say that he disliked the play, but he damned it with faint praise. Mrs. Brown is very proud of her son's achievements, but damns her daughter's with faint praise.
See also: damn, faint, praise

praise someone or something to the skies

Fig. to give someone or something much praise. He wasn't very good, but his friends praised him to the skies. They liked your pie. Everyone praised it to the skies.
See also: praise, skies

Self-praise is no recommendation.

Prov. If you praise yourself, people will think that you are boastful and will not respect you. After listening to the lawyer brag about his achievements for a solid half hour, I decided I would find someone else to handle my case. Self-praise is no recommendation.
See also: no

sing someone's or something's praises

 and sing the praises of someone or something
Fig. to praise someone highly and enthusiastically. The boss is singing his new secretary's praises. The theater critics are singing the praises of the young actor.
See also: praise, sing

damn with faint praise

Compliment so feebly that it amounts to no compliment at all, or even implies condemnation. For example, The reviewer damned the singer with faint praise, admiring her dress but not mentioning her voice . This idea was already expressed in Roman times by Favorinus (c. a.d. 110) but the actual expression comes from Alexander Pope's Epistle to Doctor Arbuthnot (1733): "Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, and, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer."
See also: damn, faint, praise

praise to the skies

Commend lavishly or excessively, as in The critics praised the new soprano to the skies. This expression, alluding to lofty praise, was in the 1600s put as extol to the skies but acquired its present form in the early 1800s. Also see sing one's praises.
See also: praise, skies

sing someone's praises

Commend someone, especially to others, as in They were singing her praises to the entire community. [Mid-1500s] Also see praise to the skies.
See also: praise, sing

damn someone/something with faint praise

If you damn someone or something with faint praise, you praise them, but in such a weak way that it is obvious that you do not really have a high opinion of them. In recent months he has consistently damned the government with faint praise. Note: People occasionally use by instead of with. He has been damned by faint praise throughout his career even though he has scored all manner of important goals. Note: You can also just talk about faint praise. Mr Robinson called him `the most obvious candidate'. That sounds like faint praise. Note: This expression was first used by the English writer Alexander Pope in his `Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot' (1735): `Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer.'

sing someone's/something's praises

COMMON If you sing someone's or something's praises, you praise them in an enthusiastic way. Smith, singing Tony's praises, said: `He's different, a real natural.' All parties are singing the praises of the multi-party system. Note: You can say that someone sings their own praises if they say good things about themselves. This may sound like we're singing our own praises here, but I honestly think most people love our music.
See also: praise, sing

damn someone or something with faint praise

praise someone or something so unenthusiastically as to imply condemnation.
This expression comes from the poet Alexander Pope's ‘Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot’ ( 1735 ): ‘Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer’.
1994 Canadian Defence Quarterly True there is the occasional condescending nod to those who served, but this frequently amounts to damning with faint praise.

sing the praises of

express enthusiastic approval or admiration of.
See also: of, praise, sing

damn somebody/something with faint ˈpraise

praise somebody/something so little that you seem to be criticizing them/it: All he said was that I was ‘capable’. Talk about damning someone with faint praise!

praise somebody/something to the ˈskies

praise somebody/something very much; say somebody/something is very good, beautiful, etc: She’s always praising you to the skies: she says she’s never had such a good assistant before. OPPOSITE: not have a good word to say for/about somebody/something

sing somebody’s/something’s ˈpraises

(informal) praise somebody/something very much or with great enthusiasm; say that somebody/something is very good: Both her grandsons are doctors, and she never stops singing their praises.One day he’s singing your praises; the next day he’s telling you you’re stupid. OPPOSITE: find fault (with somebody/something)
See also: praise, sing
References in periodicals archive ?
And we started praising them for whatever little work they did.
Praising is a very effective way of teaching a child what is right and what is wrong.
6) Essentially, the Spirit is in the praiser, and the praising behavior is testimony to the presence of the Spirit.
Wedding orators often follow Aristotle and Xenophon in praising traditionally feminine virtues.
15] Flowers, a card, a special praise poster, balloons, a gift certificate for a restaurant and other methods can show creativity in praising employees.
Some supervisors may go to the extreme when praising employees.
A discussion of the examples of faith in Luke would include Jesus commending and praising the faithful: those who carried the paralytic (5:20), the centurion (7:9), the woman who anointed Jesus' feet (7:50), the hemorrhaging woman (8:48), and, of course, the grateful leper (17:19).
They showed videotapes of President Clinton praising John Huang at a fund-raiser.
Personal praise, praising the individual, on the other hand, leads children to be less persistent and perform worse on such tasks.
Wright, in his chapter on Wilson, notes this oscillation between praising and patronizing, saying: ``It is never completely clear whether Wilson likes Paul or dislikes him, whether he is commending him to us or warning us against him.
The study, by researchers at the University of Chicago and Stanford University, showed that process praise - when parents praise the effort children make - leads kids to be more persistent and perform better on challenging tasks, while person praise - praising the individual - leads them to be less persistent and perform worse on such tasks.
Thus, the Lawyers are indicted for their future unjust or lengthy litigations, Doctors for prescribing cures for ills about which they know nothing, Teachers for corrupting their charges with a bad example, Philosophers for questioning the immortality of the soul, Poets for praising the unworthy, Merchants for engaging in dubious business practices, the Religious for being slothful in their offices and vengeful in their persecutions, and Artisans for defrauding and deceiving their customers.
It's a simple formula for noticing and praising good behavior.
In praising Milton and his "vast Design," Marvell adopts the critical language used by Jonson in praising the heroic coherence of Lucan's "whole frame"; in praising Milton as a poet who "above humane flight dost soar aloft," Marvell follows Jonson's commendation of May's success as a translator who faithfully "interpreted" the gods Phoebus and Hermes.
Catherine likewise, in her epistle "A Messieurs qui font les Grans Jours a Poitiers," exemplifies polite compliment and memorial adieu, praising the lawyers as suns of justice and vowing that she hopes to return honey for their wax, that is, mellifluous verses in return for their stamped paperwork in her interests (77v).