practice makes perfect

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practice makes perfect

Practicing or repeatedly doing something will make one become proficient or skillful at it. A: "I just can't seem to get the rhythm of this song quire right." B: "Keep at it—practice makes perfect!" You can't expect to start a new sport and be amazing at it right away. As is always the case, practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

Practice makes perfect.

Prov. Cliché Doing something over and over again is the only way to learn to do it well. Jill: I'm not going to try to play the piano anymore. I always make so many mistakes. Jane: Don't give up. Practice makes perfect. Child: How come you're so good at peeling potatoes? Father: I did it a lot in the army, and practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice makes perfect

Frequently doing something makes one better at doing it, as in I've knit at least a hundred sweaters, but in my case practice hasn't made perfect. This proverbial expression was once put as Use makes mastery, but by 1560 the present form had become established.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice makes perfect

COMMON People say practice makes perfect to mean that if you practise something enough, you will eventually be able to do it perfectly. It is like learning to ride a bike. You may fall off a few times but practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice makes perfect

regular exercise of an activity or skill is the way to become proficient in it.
See also: make, perfect, practice

ˌpractice makes ˈperfect

(saying) a way of encouraging people by telling them that if you do an activity regularly you will become very good at it: If you want to learn a language, speak it as much as you can. Practice makes perfect!
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice makes perfect

The more one does something, the better at it one becomes. This ancient proverb began as use makes perfect. In English it dates from the fifteenth century but probably was a version of a much older Latin proverb. It exists in many languages, so presumably most people agree. Ralph Waldo Emerson almost did: “Practice is nine-tenths,” he wrote (Conduct of Life: Power, 1860). An English writer in the Spectator of May 10, 1902, differed: “Practice never makes perfect. It improves up to a point.”
See also: make, perfect, practice
References in periodicals archive ?
Well, his lack of transferable skills is what keeps him here and his belief that practise makes perfect is what keeps him going.
She has to train especially hard to succeed in her sport and she was an inspiration to us all, proving that practise makes perfect.
The adage of practise makes perfect is a short-term solution but Robins appears keen to add firepower to his squad in the coming weeks if he can.
Practise makes perfect: Once you have your plan sorted have a few dry runs.
He admits it must be a case of practise makes perfect.