practice what (one) preaches

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practice what (one) preaches

To do the things or behave the way that one advises, dictates, or espouses. My parents always told us to respect each other and not to bicker, and they really did practice what they preached. If you're going to tell your employees not to incur excessive, unnecessary costs, then you had better practice what you preach.
See also: practice, preach, what

Practice what you preach.

Prov. Cliché You yourself should do the things you advise other people to do. Dad always told us we should only watch an hour of television every day, but we all knew he didn't practice what he preached.
See also: practice, preach, what

practice what you preach

Behave as you would have others behave, as in You keep telling us to clean up, but I wish you'd practice what you preach. This idiom expresses an ancient idea but appeared in this precise form only in 1678. Also see do as I say.
See also: practice, preach, what

practise what you preach

COMMON If you practise what you preach, you behave in the way that you encourage other people to behave. Note: The verb `practise' is spelled `practice' in American English. He practised what he preached, being more interested in moral values than money. I ought to be showing leadership and practise what I am preaching. Note: People sometimes vary this expression. The Bishop said the government had let the people down badly: it had preached love but practised hate.
See also: practise, preach, what

practise what you preach

do what you advise others to do.
See also: practise, preach, what

ˌpractise what you ˈpreach

(saying) live or act the way you advise others to live or act: He’s always telling me to go on a diet, but he doesn’t practise what he preaches. He needs to lose weight too!
See also: practise, preach, what
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking out and taking action against sexual assault is a deterrent to sexual violence - not only because it models healthy behavior for other male students, but also because it reminds the speaker to practice what one preaches.
It will be argued that this distinction, between straightforward hypocrisy and being, for reasons of principle, in favor of a changed system in the conditional way specified above, cannot hold water: with certain limited exceptions, one is obliged to practice what one preaches irrespective of the degree of acceptance of this preaching by others; or of their acting according to the preaching.
To the extent that we hold that one must practice what one preaches, which we surely believe to be so to a large extent, there is no escape clause.