pounce

(redirected from pouncing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

pounce at

1. To physically leap or jump at (someone or something). I can't believe your cat pounced at my face! All I was doing was trying to rub its belly. Sarah could barely keep herself from pouncing at her boyfriend as he got off the train from Toronto.
2. To seize or take advantage of (something, such as a chance or opportunity) with great alacrity or enthusiasm. I understand wanting to weigh your options, but I think you'd be a fool not to pounce at the job they've offered you. I saw an opening where I might score a goal, so I pounced at it and took the shot!
See also: pounce

pounce at the death

sports To secure an equalising goal at the final moment of the match and so avoid defeat. Primarily heard in UK, Ireland. But it was O'Grady who was destined to be the star of the match, pouncing at death in the 92nd minute of the match to equalise with the English squad and keep Ireland's tournament hopes alive.
See also: death, pounce

pounce on

1. To physically leap or jump on (someone or something). I can't believe your cat pounced on my face! All I was doing was trying to rub its belly. Sarah could barely keep herself from pouncing on her boyfriend as he got off the train from Toronto.
2. To seize or take advantage of (something, such as a chance or opportunity) with great alacrity or enthusiasm. I understand wanting to weigh your options, but I think you'd be a fool not to pounce on the job they've offered you. I saw an opening where I might score a goal, so I pounced on it and took the shot!
3. To criticize, berate, or verbally attack someone. You don't need to pounce on me just because I said your favorite film is overrated!
See also: on, pounce

pounce (up)on someone or something

to spring or swoop upon someone or something; to seize someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) As Gerald came into the room, his friend Daniel pounced on him and frightened him to death. The cat pounced upon a mouse.
See also: on, pounce

pounce on

v.
1. To jump, leap, or bound onto something or someone: The cat pounced on the mouse and killed it. We saw a falcon pounce on a rabbit.
2. To criticize or attack someone verbally: He suddenly pounced on me for not returning his book.
3. To take advantage of something enthusiastically, as an opportunity; jump at something: She pounced on the chance to move to New York and go to law school.
See also: on, pounce
References in periodicals archive ?
Furry nestled lion cubs turn into a furious tangle of chasing, pouncing, ear gnawing, and tail chomping.
A young kitten pouncing on a rolling ball is not trying to be cute; it's probably mastering instinctive hunting skills.
CULPRIT Seals are pouncing RUINED Fisherman in Dingle, Co Kerry, display the catch which was spoiled by seals yesterday
Place spiny plants such as holly or an uncomfortable surface around the base of the bird table to stop cats sitting underneath and pouncing.
Nevertheless a current surfaces, the "scientific" approach, based upon the newer technical and technological tools, like infrared reflectography and the study of pouncing, which also mirror an interest in techniques, as the kinds and combinations of instruments used by the artist to produce his drawing, for example.
Substitute Kevin Gallacher completed the rout after 87 minutes, pouncing after Richard Cresswell's header came back off the post.
Pouncing in on the action, "Disney's 102 Dalmatians Activity Center" is a Windows(R)95/98 and Macintosh(R) hybrid, available for $29.