pounce

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Related to pounces: pounce upon

pounce at

1. To physically leap or jump at (someone or something). I can't believe your cat pounced at my face! All I was doing was trying to rub its belly. Sarah could barely keep herself from pouncing at her boyfriend as he got off the train from Toronto.
2. To seize or take advantage of (something, such as a chance or opportunity) with great alacrity or enthusiasm. I understand wanting to weigh your options, but I think you'd be a fool not to pounce at the job they've offered you. I saw an opening where I might score a goal, so I pounced at it and took the shot!
See also: pounce

pounce at the death

sports To secure an equalising goal at the final moment of the match and so avoid defeat. Primarily heard in UK, Ireland. But it was O'Grady who was destined to be the star of the match, pouncing at death in the 92nd minute of the match to equalise with the English squad and keep Ireland's tournament hopes alive.
See also: death, pounce

pounce on

1. To physically leap or jump on (someone or something). I can't believe your cat pounced on my face! All I was doing was trying to rub its belly. Sarah could barely keep herself from pouncing on her boyfriend as he got off the train from Toronto.
2. To seize or take advantage of (something, such as a chance or opportunity) with great alacrity or enthusiasm. I understand wanting to weigh your options, but I think you'd be a fool not to pounce on the job they've offered you. I saw an opening where I might score a goal, so I pounced on it and took the shot!
3. To criticize, berate, or verbally attack someone. You don't need to pounce on me just because I said your favorite film is overrated!
See also: on, pounce

pounce (up)on someone or something

to spring or swoop upon someone or something; to seize someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) As Gerald came into the room, his friend Daniel pounced on him and frightened him to death. The cat pounced upon a mouse.
See also: on, pounce

pounce on

v.
1. To jump, leap, or bound onto something or someone: The cat pounced on the mouse and killed it. We saw a falcon pounce on a rabbit.
2. To criticize or attack someone verbally: He suddenly pounced on me for not returning his book.
3. To take advantage of something enthusiastically, as an opportunity; jump at something: She pounced on the chance to move to New York and go to law school.
See also: on, pounce
References in periodicals archive ?
* Before tackling a whole wall, practice removing the glaze with the pounces in a small area.
Dennis Bergkamp pounces on the loose ball and after being forced wide his shot from the angle is cleared off the line by Chris Baird.
Moments like these--watching up close as a predator pounces or handling some big insect--are what make insect zoos so compelling.
Moreover, that chirping, or stridulation -- often amplified in movies to a blood-curdling roar just before a city-block-sized orthopteroid pounces on its prey -- is in real life not a war cry but a love song.
TERROR: Raider pretending to use cash machine pounces on security man; Unsuspecting guard arrives; Guard passes gangster; Raider chooses moment to strike
THUMBS UP: O'Neill looks on from the stand: MAGNIFICENT SEVEN: Henrik Larsson pounces to seal Celtic's victory at Parkhead
WILD: Tracy pounces on radio DJ Joel Ross before getting him to strip off
Owen pounces to sweep in a shot, but Martin Keown makes an important block tackle for the Gunners.