pounce

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pounce at

1. To physically leap or jump at (someone or something). I can't believe your cat pounced at my face! All I was doing was trying to rub its belly. Sarah could barely keep herself from pouncing at her boyfriend as he got off the train from Toronto.
2. To seize or take advantage of (something, such as a chance or opportunity) with great alacrity or enthusiasm. I understand wanting to weigh your options, but I think you'd be a fool not to pounce at the job they've offered you. I saw an opening where I might score a goal, so I pounced at it and took the shot!
See also: pounce

pounce at the death

sports To secure an equalizing goal at the final moment of the match and so avoid defeat. Primarily heard in UK, Ireland. But it was O'Grady who was destined to be the star of the match, pouncing at death in the 92nd minute of the match to equalise with the English squad and keep Ireland's tournament hopes alive.
See also: death, pounce

pounce on (someone or something)

1. To physically leap or jump on (someone or something). I can't believe your cat pounced on my face! All I was doing was trying to rub its belly. Sarah could barely keep herself from pouncing on her boyfriend as he got off the train from Toronto.
2. To seize or take advantage of (something, such as a chance or opportunity) with great alacrity or enthusiasm. I understand wanting to weigh your options, but I think you'd be a fool not to pounce on the job they've offered you. I saw an opening where I might score a goal, so I pounced on it and took the shot!
3. To criticize, berate, or verbally attack someone. You don't need to pounce on me just because I said your favorite film is overrated!
See also: on, pounce
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

pounce (up)on someone or something

to spring or swoop upon someone or something; to seize someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) As Gerald came into the room, his friend Daniel pounced on him and frightened him to death. The cat pounced upon a mouse.
See also: on, pounce
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pounce on

v.
1. To jump, leap, or bound onto something or someone: The cat pounced on the mouse and killed it. We saw a falcon pounce on a rabbit.
2. To criticize or attack someone verbally: He suddenly pounced on me for not returning his book.
3. To take advantage of something enthusiastically, as an opportunity; jump at something: She pounced on the chance to move to New York and go to law school.
See also: on, pounce
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As well as to inform, the Pouncers are there to ensure you don't steal the castle and its belongings.
BBC colleagues called him "The Pouncer." Patricia, [his friend] Claud Cockburn's wife, compared him to a Russian peasant, describing an incident when during a dinner party she went upstairs to make a phone call and was pursued by Malcolm who began to assault her.
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In fairness I've been both the pouncer and the pounced in the past so I've counted every one of those cobbled steps.
Other popular stablemates you may recall were The Mole, The Pouncer and The Wee Cobbler.