pounce


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pounce at

1. To physically leap or jump at (someone or something). I can't believe your cat pounced at my face! All I was doing was trying to rub its belly. Sarah could barely keep herself from pouncing at her boyfriend as he got off the train from Toronto.
2. To seize or take advantage of (something, such as a chance or opportunity) with great alacrity or enthusiasm. I understand wanting to weigh your options, but I think you'd be a fool not to pounce at the job they've offered you. I saw an opening where I might score a goal, so I pounced at it and took the shot!
See also: pounce

pounce at the death

sports To secure an equalising goal at the final moment of the match and so avoid defeat. Primarily heard in UK, Ireland. But it was O'Grady who was destined to be the star of the match, pouncing at death in the 92nd minute of the match to equalise with the English squad and keep Ireland's tournament hopes alive.
See also: death, pounce

pounce on

1. To physically leap or jump on (someone or something). I can't believe your cat pounced on my face! All I was doing was trying to rub its belly. Sarah could barely keep herself from pouncing on her boyfriend as he got off the train from Toronto.
2. To seize or take advantage of (something, such as a chance or opportunity) with great alacrity or enthusiasm. I understand wanting to weigh your options, but I think you'd be a fool not to pounce on the job they've offered you. I saw an opening where I might score a goal, so I pounced on it and took the shot!
3. To criticize, berate, or verbally attack someone. You don't need to pounce on me just because I said your favorite film is overrated!
See also: on, pounce

pounce (up)on someone or something

to spring or swoop upon someone or something; to seize someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) As Gerald came into the room, his friend Daniel pounced on him and frightened him to death. The cat pounced upon a mouse.
See also: on, pounce

pounce on

v.
1. To jump, leap, or bound onto something or someone: The cat pounced on the mouse and killed it. We saw a falcon pounce on a rabbit.
2. To criticize or attack someone verbally: He suddenly pounced on me for not returning his book.
3. To take advantage of something enthusiastically, as an opportunity; jump at something: She pounced on the chance to move to New York and go to law school.
See also: on, pounce
References in periodicals archive ?
The upcoming ads for HBC Olympic apparel will be the first to display the Pounce mobile app opportunity for customers, the company said, adding that the app has also launched in the US for Lord & Taylor.
One person presses a cotton pounce into the wet glaze to create a rough, ragged look, rotating the pounce to avoid patterns.
Kane posted a picture of some lions on social media, claiming Spurs are ready to pounce on the Foxes, and Pochettino (below) added: "It shows how the group is and the desire and passion we show.
Then the mouse family does something quite brave: They support Pounce in searching for and finding a family of his own kind, far away in Africa, so he can finish growing to be a lion king.
Dundee stepped-up the pace on the restart and Craig McKeown saved the day with a crucial header with Lynch poised to pounce on Anderson's cross.
But in the honest-to-goodness, bug-eat-bug world -- where the element of surprise can make all the difference between eating or starving -- "it would be kind of maladaptive to stridulate before they pounce.
EVERYONE knows you pop star 'til Madonna's But Nicki Minaj says wasn't expecting Madg pounce on her at her b bash.
They say the predators are waiting until their nets are full before they pounce as the catches are drawn in.
Regrettably, this is the kind of society we have today with feral predators willing to pounce on vulnerable individuals.
MANCHESTER UNITED skipper Roy Keane has told leaders Chelsea: "We're ready to pounce.