potluck


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pot luck

1. A situation or circumstance in which the outcome is uncertain but where one takes a chance in the hopes of achieving a fortunate or beneficial end result. (Used especially in the phrase "take pot luck.") I like to just take pot luck when I travel to new cities and try out whatever local establishments I happen upon. I love going into old antique stores. I know finding something worthwhile is just a bit of pot luck, but it's fun to see all the old things they have!
2. (More often "potluck.") A shared meal in which separate dishes are prepared and/or brought by different individuals; the food that is brought to such a meal. Primarily heard in US. Sarah and I are hosting a pot luck this Saturday, and you are both welcome to join us! Just bring something that we can all share! Potluck dinners are a great way for neighbors or groups of friends to spend time together or get to know each other better. We're just asking guests to bring a bit of pot-luck, nothing fancy!
See also: luck, pot

take pot luck

To select blindly from the available options in the hopes of achieving a fortunate or beneficial end result. I like to just take pot luck when I travel to new cities and try out whatever local establishments I happen upon.
See also: luck, pot, take

be pot luck

To be a casual meal in which nothing has been prepared in advance. (A potluck, when spelled as one word, is a shared meal in which separate dishes are prepared and/or brought by different individuals.) Primarily heard in US. I hope you can join us for dinner on Saturday—it'll be pot luck, so just bring something that we can all share!
See also: luck, pot

take potluck

Come to eat whatever happens to be served; also, take one's chances. For example, You're welcome to join us for supper but you'll have to take potluck, or When the flight was canceled, passengers had to take potluck on other airlines. This idiom alludes to accepting whatever happens to be in the cooking pot. [Second half of 1700s]
See also: potluck, take

be pot luck

If you ask someone to have a meal at your house and you tell them it will be pot luck, you mean that you have not planned it or prepared any special food. Note: `Pot luck' is usually written as `potluck' in American English. `We'll just be casual and eat in the kitchen. It's just pot luck,' Moira said. `Hope you don't mind.' Note: A potluck is a meal at which different guests bring different parts of the meal.
See also: luck, pot

take pot luck

COMMON If you take pot luck, you make a choice from what is available although you do not have any knowledge to help you. Note: `Pot luck' is usually written as `potluck' in American English. We'd take potluck at whatever restaurants might still be open. Just leave the highway, drive out into the country, pick on a small town and take pot luck. Note: You can say that something is pot luck when it is a matter of luck whether you get something good. The major stores change their products regularly, so finding good deals is pot luck. Note: You can also use pot-luck before a noun. Travel firms are offering great holidays on a pot-luck basis.
See also: luck, pot, take

take pot luck

take a chance that whatever is available will prove to be good or acceptable.
The original idea behind the expression is of someone invited to an ordinary everyday family meal which will consist of whatever happens to be in the cooking pot that day.
See also: luck, pot, take

take ˌpot ˈluck

(informal) choose something or go somewhere without knowing very much about it, but hope that it will be good, pleasant, etc: ‘Did somebody recommend the hotel to you?’ ‘No, we just took pot luck. It was the first hotel in the brochure.’You’re welcome to stay for supper, but you’ll have to take pot luck (= eat whatever is available).
See also: luck, pot, take

pot luck

Also, potluck. Describing whatever food may be available for or contributed to a meal. The term dates from the second half of the eighteenth century and can be used adjectivally, as in “We’re having a pot luck supper; bring whatever you want,” or as a noun “You’ll just have to take pot luck.” It alludes to whatever is in the cooking pot. It also has been used figuratively for taking one’s chances on issues other than food. For example, “With the snowstorm canceling all flights, you’ll just have to take pot luck on other means of transportation.”
See also: luck, pot
References in periodicals archive ?
Your body is coming into balance, and this potluck is to share notes on how good you feel--and plan some calculated steps backward armed with a glucose monitor and your notebook.
The iftar last week saw various nationalities bringing pieces of their culture and energy to the potluck. It was the first time for Haidy El Hakem, an Egyptian from Sharjah.
"A potluck can very likely serve your goals without the cost or regulator barriers of a commercial kitchen enterprise," says Brett Olson, creative director at Renewing the Countryside, a nonprofit organization that champions rural entrepreneurship, including training for farmers interested in diversifying into on-farm food service.
"After two years building Branch and Potluck, I am thrilled to announce that we will be continuing our mission at Facebook," said Miller.
According to The Verge, Branch recently launched Potluck for iPhone, a Tinder-meets-Circa news app that served up bite-sized news clips a user could talk about with friends inside the app.
Potluck dinners and bake sales are internal fund-raising events--associates bring in food or baked goods which are then sold to their coworkers.
Three years ago, a core group of 14 parishioners "pulled out all the stops" for Back to Church Sunday--delivering invitations, putting up posters, scrubbing the church from top to bottom, polishing the brass, planning special music for the service and a potluck for after the service.
A 'potluck' is a community or church dinner where everyone brings a dish to share.
Christmas potluck meal from entering the fenced-off square.
Their goal was to break the record for the World's Largest Potluck, and they failed.
Workshops are scheduled on April 7, 8, 9 and 10, and several feature potluck suppers.
The New Brunswick Branch held its annual Christmas Potluck Luncheon and Auction on Saturday, 12 December 2009 at St.
Louis held its annual potluck and elections, hosting International Co-President Kirsten Greback.