postal

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Related to postals: postal service
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go ballistic

To become wildly or uncontrollably angry. My parents went totally ballistic when they found out I'd wrecked the car! Now, don't go ballistic or anything, but I've decided to move to Canada.
See also: ballistic, go

go postal

1. slang To shoot or otherwise attack one's coworkers (and/or random people) in a rage, typically after becoming disgruntled in one's workplace. The phrase originated after a series of unrelated incidents in the 1980s and '90s in which American postal workers shot coworkers or members of the public. You've got to watch out for the quiet types—they're the ones who end up going postal and shooting up the place.
2. slang By extension, to become wildly or uncontrollably angry. He wasn't happy with me and went postal when he heard what I had to say.
See also: go, postal
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go ballistic

 and go postal
Fig. to become irrationally enraged. (Ballistic refers to a missile launching; postal refers to an enraged post office employee attacking those at his place of work. See also go into orbit.) The boss went ballistic when he saw my expense report. She was so mad, I thought she was going to go postal.
See also: ballistic, go
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

go ballistic

Become extremely upset or angry, as in Dad will go ballistic when he sees you dented the new car. This expression, a variation on go berserk, originally alluded to a guided missile going out of control. [Slang; mid-1980s]
See also: ballistic, go
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

go ballistic

INFORMAL
If someone goes ballistic, they get extremely angry. They claim the singer went ballistic after a member of his band failed to show up for a sound check. She'll go ballistic when she finds out. Note: This expression uses the image of a ballistic missile, and the powerful explosion which it causes. Compare with go nuclear.
See also: ballistic, go

go postal

mainly AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If someone goes postal, they become extremely angry and lose control of themselves. He went postal and punched a police officer in the face. Compare with go ballistic. Note: This expression comes from a series of shootings carried out by US postal workers.
See also: go, postal
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

go ballistic

fly into a rage. informal
1998 New Scientist The French nuclear industry, local authorities around La Hague and some government agencies went ballistic. Viel was fiercely condemned for his findings.
See also: ballistic, go

go postal

go mad, especially from stress. US informal
This expression arose as a result of several recorded cases in the USA in which postal-service employees ran amok and shot colleagues.
1999 New Yorker A man two seats away ‘went postal’ when the battery on his cell phone gave out. A heavyset passenger had to sit on the man until the train finally pulled into Grand Central.
See also: go, postal
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

go balˈlistic

(informal) become very angry: He went ballistic when I told him about the accident.A ballistic missile is a weapon that is sent through the air and that explodes when it hits the thing that it is aimed at. When it goes ballistic it starts to fall towards its target and so becomes very dangerous.
See also: ballistic, go

go ˈpostal

(American English, informal) become extremely angry or start behaving in a violent and angry way: According to one eye witness, the man ‘went postal, and started hitting his computer’.This expression originated in the USA in the 1990s, where there were several incidents of postal workers losing control and shooting members of the public in post offices.
See also: go, postal
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

go postal

in. to become wild; to go berserk. He made me so mad I thought I would go postal.
See also: go, postal
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

go ballistic

Slang
To become very angry or irrational.
See also: ballistic, go

go postal

Slang To become extremely angry or deranged, especially in an outburst of violence.
See also: go, postal
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
On the south edge of it I can see a postal packet's light ploughing through the white fleece.
He had been in authority over thirty-five hundred postal employees, and was the developer of a system that covered every inhabited portion of the country.
He paid one of his fifteen cents for a postal card, and his companion wrote a note to the family, telling them where he was and when he would be tried.
Crum wrote) "that I have heard from Miss Silvester, by the next postal delivery ensuing, after I had dispatched my letter to Ham Farm.
What would he know of railway companies, of social movements, of telephone and telegraph wires, of the Parcels Delivery Company, and postal orders and the like?
I was already with the royal army and of course there could be no question of regular postal communications with France.
I spent about two pounds on sixpenny postal orders when the Limerick craze was on, and didn't win a thing.
The virtual cessation of postal distribution and the collapse of all newspaper enterprise had left an immense and aching gap in the mental life of this time.
It was ordered by letter, and a postal order was enclosed.
It is quite certain that he invented a portable pillar-box, which he put up at corners in quiet suburbs on the chance of strangers dropping postal orders into it.