possession

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in (one's) possession

Owned, held by, or under the custody of someone. With her father's inheritance in her possession, Samantha intends to start her own business. The detective wanted to know how long the victim's diary had been in the suspect's possession. Are you on your way to get it, or is literally already in your possession?
See also: possession

possession is nine-tenths of the law

Actually possessing or having custody of something represents a strong legal claim to it (moreso than simply claiming ownership). She's arguing that the antique stopwatch rightfully belongs to her, but possession is nine-tenths of the law.
See also: law, of, possession

take possession (of something)

To gain or assume ownership or custody of something. She took possession of the house following the court's ruling that she was the legal inheritor of the estate. The bank took possession of my car after I was unable to keep up my monthly repayments.
See also: possession, take

possession is nine points of the law

Actually possessing or having custody of something represents a strong legal claim to it (more so than simply claiming ownership). She's arguing that the antique stopwatch rightfully belongs to her, but possession is nine points of the law.
See also: law, nine, of, point, possession

possession is nine parts of the law

Actually possessing or having custody of something represents a strong legal claim to it (more so than simply claiming ownership). She's arguing that the antique stopwatch rightfully belongs to her, but possession is nine parts of the law.
See also: law, nine, of, part, possession

*in someone's possession

held by someone; owned by someone. (*Typically: be ~; come [into] ~.) The book is now in my possession. How long has this object been in your possession?
See also: possession

Possession is nine-tenths of the law.

Prov. If you actually possess something, you have a stronger legal claim to owning it than someone who merely says it belongs to him or her. Dana may say he owns this house, but we actually live in it, and possession is nine-tenths of the law.
See also: law, of, possession

take possession (of something)

to assume ownership of something. I am to take possession of the house as soon as we sign the papers.
See also: possession, take

possession is nine points of the law

Actually holding something is better than merely claiming it. For example, When Karen told John he must return the sofa he'd borrowed, he said possession is nine points of the law . This term originally alluded to nine elements that would aid someone's lawsuit, among them a good lawyer, good witnesses, a good jury, a good judge, and good luck. In time, however, the term was used more for squatter's rights. [Late 1500s]
See also: law, nine, of, point, possession

possession is nine points/tenths/parts of the ˈlaw

(saying) if you already have or control something, it is difficult for somebody else to take it away from you, even if they have the legal right to it
See also: law, nine, of, part, point, possession, tenth

take posˈsession (of something)

(formal) become the owner of something: He couldn’t pay his taxes, so the government took possession of his property.
See also: possession, take

possession is nine points of the law

To hold or control something gives one a greater advantage than simply claiming ownership or control. This term dates from the late sixteenth century. An early appearance in print was in T. Draxe’s Bibliotheca Scholastica (1616): “Possession is nine points in the Law.” Later references sometimes put it at eleven points, but nine is what has survived. The nine points in question are: (1) a good purse (much money); (2) a good deal of patience; (3) a good cause; (4) a good lawyer; (5) good counsel; (6) good witnesses; (7) a good jury; (8) a good judge; and (9) good luck. With these advantages one is apt to win one’s case. Today, however, the term is used more in the sense of squatter’s rights—that is, “I have it; just try and take it away from me”—than in any strict legal sense.
See also: law, nine, of, point, possession

possession is nine-tenths of the law

Custody presumes ownership. The basis of this legal maxim that comes down from the 17th-century is the commonsense observation that if you have control of something, chances are better than average that it's yours. Lawyers term it a rebuttable presumption: ownership is recognized unless disproved by someone holding a more valid claim. The phrase started life as “possession is nine points of the law,” which referred to possession's satisfying nine out of eleven factors that constituted absolute ownership. However, “nine-tenths” entered popular usage to reflect the idea that custody is 90 percent of legal ownership.
See also: law, of, possession
References in periodicals archive ?
Uefa's stats say that teams who finished bottom of their group averaged 379 possessions per goal, but teams who finished top of their groups still averaged as many as 77.
On a tip-off, police raided a house in Naseerabad area and arrested Arif Jan, while recovering 680 gram Charas from suspects' possession.
PS Civil Lines arrested Sheraaz and Yaseen and recovered five, five liter liquor from their possessions.
In this regard, too much attention is paid to lexemes and not enough to scripts, and the need to differentiate between possessions that are scripted only by being narrated or imagined in Sanskrit texts and possessions that are ritually scripted and tied not only to lexemes but rituals, iconic forms and images, and prototypical figures of myth.
* Create a list of your possessions. Take an inventory of your possessions by listing the make, model, serial number, and cost of the items.
A common California issue involving the treatment of 936 possessions corporations that have been excluded under a water's-edge election involves the application of the section 936(h) profit-split method.
and sells it in a possession or vice versa (Possession Production Sales), and when a taxpayer purchases inventory in a possession and sells it in the U.S.
And I have continued to fill them up with more possessions over the years.
The point was raised, briefly, as a mitigating factor, in arguing that Foster's offense should be treated as simple possession. But no medical experts were called, and no testimony was heard about marijuana's effectiveness as an analgesic for conditions such as Will's.
Bergerus's colleagues responded to this quandary not only by denouncing Bergerus's activities, but by calling into question the genuineness of the possessions he was claiming to cure.
Ball-possession teams, especially when protecting a lead late in the game, must try to impose their tempo by controlling: (1) the time and quality of their possessions, (2) the areas of the field in which the ball is being played, (3) the areas in which their possessions are being lost, and (4) the quality of the passing options available to the opponents on possession losses.
Tenant's counsel asserted that inasmuch as the tenant stored some personal possessions in the apartment and, on occasion, has her family conduct some of her business affairs in the apartment, the occupancy requirement of the stipulation was met.
For example, in its World Cup '94 game against the U.S., 19.2% (29) of her possessions produced four or more passes in her attacking half to the U.S.'s 6.6% (10); and in their rematch in Copa America, the ratios were 13.8% (23) and 6.6% (11), respectively.
Jesus would not look favorably upon all of my possessions. 39% agree 56% disagree 5% other
Section 936 of the Code generally provides an electing domestic corporation (the "possessions corporation") with a tax credit equal to the portion of U.S.