possession


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Related to possession: Demonic possession

in (one's) possession

Owned, held by, or under the custody of someone. With her father's inheritance in her possession, Samantha intends to start her own business. The detective wanted to know how long the victim's diary had been in the suspect's possession. Are you on your way to get it, or is literally already in your possession?
See also: possession

possession is nine-tenths of the law

Actually possessing or having custody of something represents a strong legal claim to it (moreso than simply claiming ownership). She's arguing that the antique stopwatch rightfully belongs to her, but possession is nine-tenths of the law.
See also: law, of, possession

take possession (of something)

To gain or assume ownership or custody of something. She took possession of the house following the court's ruling that she was the legal inheritor of the estate. The bank took possession of my car after I was unable to keep up my monthly repayments.
See also: possession, take

possession is nine points of the law

Actually possessing or having custody of something represents a strong legal claim to it (more so than simply claiming ownership). She's arguing that the antique stopwatch rightfully belongs to her, but possession is nine points of the law.
See also: law, nine, of, point, possession

possession is nine parts of the law

Actually possessing or having custody of something represents a strong legal claim to it (more so than simply claiming ownership). She's arguing that the antique stopwatch rightfully belongs to her, but possession is nine parts of the law.
See also: law, nine, of, part, possession

*in someone's possession

held by someone; owned by someone. (*Typically: be ~; come [into] ~.) The book is now in my possession. How long has this object been in your possession?
See also: possession

Possession is nine-tenths of the law.

Prov. If you actually possess something, you have a stronger legal claim to owning it than someone who merely says it belongs to him or her. Dana may say he owns this house, but we actually live in it, and possession is nine-tenths of the law.
See also: law, of, possession

take possession (of something)

to assume ownership of something. I am to take possession of the house as soon as we sign the papers.
See also: possession, take

possession is nine points of the law

Actually holding something is better than merely claiming it. For example, When Karen told John he must return the sofa he'd borrowed, he said possession is nine points of the law . This term originally alluded to nine elements that would aid someone's lawsuit, among them a good lawyer, good witnesses, a good jury, a good judge, and good luck. In time, however, the term was used more for squatter's rights. [Late 1500s]
See also: law, nine, of, point, possession

possession is nine points/tenths/parts of the ˈlaw

(saying) if you already have or control something, it is difficult for somebody else to take it away from you, even if they have the legal right to it
See also: law, nine, of, part, point, possession, tenth

take posˈsession (of something)

(formal) become the owner of something: He couldn’t pay his taxes, so the government took possession of his property.
See also: possession, take

possession is nine points of the law

To hold or control something gives one a greater advantage than simply claiming ownership or control. This term dates from the late sixteenth century. An early appearance in print was in T. Draxe’s Bibliotheca Scholastica (1616): “Possession is nine points in the Law.” Later references sometimes put it at eleven points, but nine is what has survived. The nine points in question are: (1) a good purse (much money); (2) a good deal of patience; (3) a good cause; (4) a good lawyer; (5) good counsel; (6) good witnesses; (7) a good jury; (8) a good judge; and (9) good luck. With these advantages one is apt to win one’s case. Today, however, the term is used more in the sense of squatter’s rights—that is, “I have it; just try and take it away from me”—than in any strict legal sense.
See also: law, nine, of, point, possession

possession is nine-tenths of the law

Custody presumes ownership. The basis of this legal maxim that comes down from the 17th-century is the commonsense observation that if you have control of something, chances are better than average that it's yours. Lawyers term it a rebuttable presumption: ownership is recognized unless disproved by someone holding a more valid claim. The phrase started life as “possession is nine points of the law,” which referred to possession's satisfying nine out of eleven factors that constituted absolute ownership. However, “nine-tenths” entered popular usage to reflect the idea that custody is 90 percent of legal ownership.
See also: law, of, possession
References in periodicals archive ?
There are many people who have employed deceit to gain possession of land.
A spokesman for Bahawalpur police said here that a police party raided a den and arrested three suspects and recovered liquor from their possession.
The ruling means that even if China occupies or controls Philippine reefs in the West Philippine Sea, it cannot acquire lawful possession of them.
"I think the President did not say that they (Chinese) are in possession, but that they are in position," National Security Adviser Hermogenes Esperon Jr.
* Amanda Kronsbein, 29, of Marion, was charged with disorderly conduct and possession of a controlled substance in the in the 600 block of Hadfield Steet on July 6.
| Paul Marley, 43 and of Calver Place, Glossop, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to produce Class B (amphetamine); conspiracy to supply Class A (cocaine); conspiracy to supply Class B (cannabis); possession of Class B (cannabis); and driving while disqualified and was jailed for nine years.
Paul Marley, 43, of Calver Place, Glossop, Derbyshire pleaded guilty to conspiracy to produce Class B (amphetamine); conspiracy to supply Class A (cocaine); conspiracy to supply Class B (cannabis); possession of Class B (cannabis); and driving while disqualified and was jailed for nine years.
The man, who has a prior felony conviction, is charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm.
Applying for Adverse Possession Under the old regime, in the event that the occupier can satisfy these two requirements, they are able to apply for registration as the owner by adverse possession.
The Providence County Grand Jury returned an indictment charging Matthew Heal with one count of possession of fentanyl (1 oz.
In another police action, the police arrested a drug peddler and recovered 1,190 gram hashish from his possession.
About nine out of 10 arrests were for possession, and the other category, sale/manufacture, included cultivation for personal use.
Seven decades after Lillian Hellman's play The Children's Hour validated and annihilated lesbian desire in the same breath, Possession returns gay women to the back of the bus, relegating Blanche to the thankless role of the long-suffering, suicidal doormat.
Christopher Dinneen also faced the same charges in relation to membership and possession of explosives and ammunition, but in addition, was also charged with possession of an assault rifle.
Liquor laws--The violation of state or local laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use of alcoholic beverages, not including driving under the influence and drunkenness.