pop off

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pop off

1. To say something very quickly or abruptly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pop" and "off." I was able to pop off a few questions before the governor was escorted into his car.
2. To kill (someone), especially quickly or abruptly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pop" and "off." Take a look, chief. The video shows the suspect pop the guard off before entering the building.
3. To have a sudden, thoughtless outburst or issue an angry remark or snide comment. Why did you pop off at me like that? I was just trying to help. If you're just going to sit there popping off all class, I'll have to ask you to leave.
4. To die suddenly or unexpectedly. No sooner had he taken control of the company than he up and popped off. Very suspicious, if you ask me.
5. To leave or depart suddenly, hurriedly, or unexpectedly. I think I'm going to pop off. I need to be up early tomorrow. She popped off before I could ask for her phone number.
See also: off, pop
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

pop someone off

Inf. to kill someone. Max was told to pop Lefty off because he was trying to muscle in on the gang's turf. Max intended to pop off Lefty.
See also: off, pop

pop off

 
1. Sl. to make an unnecessary remark; to interrupt with a remark; to sound off. Please don't pop off all the time. Bob keeps popping off when he should be listening.
2. Sl. to lose one's temper. Now, don't pop off. Keep your cool. I don't know why she popped off at me. All I did was say hello.
3. Sl. to die. My uncle popped off last week. I hope I'm asleep when I pop off.
4. Sl. to leave; to depart in haste. Bye, I must pop off. Got to pop off. I'm late.
See also: off, pop
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pop off

1. Leave abruptly or hurriedly, as in I'm just going to pop off and mail some letters.
2. Die suddenly, as in No one expected her to pop off like that. [Colloquial; second half of 1700s]
3. Speak thoughtlessly in an angry outburst, as in Don't pop off at me-complain to whoever's responsible. [Slang; c. 1930]
4. pop someone off. Kill someone, as in The sniper popped off at least three men. [Slang; early 1800s] All four usages transfer pop in the sense of "explode" to other kinds of sudden or violent behavior.
See also: off, pop
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pop off

v. Slang
1. To burst off with a short, sharp, explosive sound: If the pressure in the bottle gets too high, the top will pop off.
2. To leave abruptly or hurriedly: She popped off a few minutes ago, but I don't know where she went. He popped off to the store.
3. To speak thoughtlessly in a burst of released anger: The movie star popped off at the reporters who were hounding him.
4. To die suddenly: The book is about a rich man who pops off and leaves his family millions of dollars.
5. To kill someone: The gangster popped off the witness outside of the courtroom. She learned that he was a double agent, and so she popped him off the next time she saw him.
See also: off, pop
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pop off

1. in. to make an unnecessary remark; to interrupt with a remark; to sound off. Bob keeps popping off when he should be listening.
2. in. to lose one’s temper. (see also pop one’s cork.) I don’t know why she popped off at me. All I did was say hello.
3. in. to die. I hope I’m asleep when I pop off.
4. in. to leave; to depart in haste. Got to pop off. I’m late.
See also: off, pop
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"It's not like they were popping off to the gym every two seconds, but they were very image conscious, that's for sure." (ANI)
FANCY popping off to the Amazon rain forest for a quick spot of four-wheeled adventure trekking?
The outburst blew off a piece of the comet's icy crust, like a cork popping off a champagne bottle.
And he gets slaughtered by us because he is popping off to the opera every now and again and going to art galleries.
He depicts something popping off in a terrified crowd, gunpoint arrests of civilians by troops, the sludge created by gold miners, a boy flying a ragged kite above straw hovels, the panicked faces of those in custody, the jowly ones of those in power, funerals, magic dances.
I AM writing regarding `Our Neighbourhood Policing is Failing' (ECHO,June 5.) I agree with Cllr Warren Bradley 100%.The police have lost control of law and order in this country and only manage to keep the lid on it but the problem is the lid keeps popping off and one day it's not going to go back on.
Although Earth-orbiting satellites record a burst popping off at least once a day, astronomers have measured the distance to only a handful.
When she wasn't about to pop out of her dress the jazz babe was popping off for a quick snog with her hubby.
We caught her between takes in Manchester popping off in her mini to a lay-by to meet fianc Matthew Smith for hot chips and a cheeky kiss in his white van.