pool

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scoop the pool

To win all, most, or the most coveted of the available awards or rewards in some competition. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. The film scooped the pool at the awards ceremony last night, winning the three top prizes for Best Picture, Best Actor, and Best Actress. Among online retailers, the new company clearly scooped the pool this year, capturing an incredible 70% of the market.
See also: pool, scoop

pool up

1. Of liquid, to accumulate into a pool. It turns out that rain water had been pooling up under the foundations, causing a massive amount of damage to the property.
2. To gather up, accumulate, or group together something, especially money or other resources, from various places or sources. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pool" and "up." We've all been pooling our money up to buy these lottery tickets, so we all deserve equal shares of the winnings! The four companies came together pooled up their top legal teams to sue the government over the new law.
See also: pool, up

scoop the pool (or the kitty)

be completely successful; gain everything.
In gambling games, the pool or kitty is the total amount of money that is staked.
See also: pool, scoop

pool up

v.
1. To accumulate in pools of liquid: Because the seal around the bathtub leaks, water pools up on the floor every time I shower.
2. To group some resources for the common advantage of the participants or contributors: We pooled our money up so that we could buy a new TV. If the kids pool up their allowances, they could buy a baseball bat.
See also: pool, up

dirty pool

n. activities conducted using unfair or sneaky tactics. When they start playing dirty pool, it’s time to get mean.
See also: dirty, pool

pocket pool

n. the act of a male playing with his genitals with his hand in his pants pocket. (Usually objectionable.) Stop playing pocket pool and get to work.
See also: pocket, pool

pool-hopping

n. sneaking into private or public swimming pools at night or during the off-hours. The kids went pool-hopping, and one of them nearly drowned.
References in classic literature ?
The Pool is a deep, walled ditch, through which a clear stream of water runs, that comes from under Jerusalem somewhere, and passing through the Fountain of the Virgin, or being supplied from it, reaches this place by way of a tunnel of heavy masonry.
The water is too cold--they never leave the warm water of the great pool," replied An-Tak.
With an oath he pushed his gruesome companion out into mid-stream to float on down toward the great pool and the awaiting scavengers of the deep.
She led him to the pool, and although there were still a few ripples on the surface of the water he could see his reflection plainly.
He scrambled ashore and shook himself to get off some of the wet, and then leaned over the pool to look admiringly at his reflected face.
For the Mouse was swimming away from her as hard as it could go, and making quite a commotion in the pool as it went.
It was high time to go, for the pool was getting quite crowded with the birds and animals that had fallen into it: there were a Duck and a Dodo, a Lory and an Eaglet, and several other curious creatures.
Rile some other pool with your clumsy hoofs, and let your betters alone after this
One is that the murdered man had an appointment with someone at the pool, and that the someone could not have been his son, for his son was away, and he did not know when he would return.
Not satisfied with his position by the board tree, he lowered his gun to his side and crept closer to the pool.
Torith took a half step toward the entrance to the pool as though to corroborate my story.
Grose took again, into the queer element I offered her, one of her plunges of submission; then I pointed out that the boat might perfectly be in a small refuge formed by one of the recesses of the pool, an indentation masked, for the hither side, by a projection of the bank and by a clump of trees growing close to the water.
That was in the days when, in the part called the Pool, just below London Bridge, the vessels moored stem and stern in the very strength of the tide formed one solid mass like an island covered with a forest of gaunt, leafless trees; and when the trade had grown too big for the river there came the St.
George Willard went out of the pool room and into Main Street.
On account of the rains, the waters had flooded the surrounding grass, which showed like a beautiful emerald path, tempting these feet towards the central pool.