pointed

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point (one) in the right direction

1. Literally, to show one the correct route, often by actually pointing in the direction of the desired destination. A: "I think I'm close to Suite 200, but I haven't been able to find it. Can you point me in the right direction?" B: "Sure—walk straight that way and it will be on your left."
2. By extension, to give one advice or information that helps guide them toward a desired outcome or course of action. We're hopeful that our financial planning services can help point people in the right direction when they look to buy their first home. I was at a loss as to how to proceed with the project, but thankfully Janet was able to point me in the right direction.
See also: direction, point, right

point at

1. To extend one's finger, especially the index finger, in the direction of someone or something. The librarian pointed at the sign that said to keep quiet. "There he is! That's the guy who mugged me, officer!" I said, pointing to the man crossing the street.
2. To direct, aim, or indicate at or in the direction of someone or something. We set up signs pointing at the house so no one would get lost on their way to the party. The GPS marker pointed at a rest stop a few miles from where we were.
3. To direct or aim someone or something in the direction of someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "point" and "at." Don't point that thing at me—the radiation off those devices causes cancer! I turned her around and pointed her at the rack of books labeled "Computer Sciences." He pointed his rifle at the deer, but he couldn't bring himself to pull the trigger.
4. To indicate some particular outcome, possibility, interpretation, etc. All these signs point at a renewed interest in the market for these sorts of devices. The patterns of the killings point at a single murder who has developed a particular MO.
See also: point

point down to (someone or something)

To direct, aim, or indicate directly downward in the direction of someone or something. You need to put up a sign that points down to your shop or something, because it's impossible to find your place when you walk by! He pointed down to a man on the ground floor when I asked who was in charge of security in the mall.
See also: down, point, to

point fingers (at someone or something)

To indicate that someone or something guilty of (doing) something; to blame or accuse someone or something of (doing) something. A: "It was your fault the launch failed!" B: "My fault? You're the developer!" C: "Whoa, let's not point fingers here, gentlemen." I know you guys all want to point fingers at me, but I swear, this wasn't my fault. Many analysts are pointing fingers at the company's recent scandal for its lackluster fiscal quarter.
See also: finger, point, someone

point out

1. To bring attention to someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "out." She always points out my mistakes in front of the boss to make me look bad. Oh, that's interesting. I never would have noticed if you hadn't pointed it out. I'd just like to point out that Regina deserves most of the credit for the design—I just helped her revise it.
2. To identify someone or something within a group or crowd. A noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "out." The witness came to the police station and pointed the suspect out from a lineup. Just point out which ones you want and I'll wrap them up for you.
See also: out, point

point Percy at the porcelain

slang To urinate. Typically said of a male. Primarily heard in Australia. Be right back, I've gotta go point Percy at the porcelain.
See also: point, porcelain

point the bone at (someone or something)

1. To predict someone's or something's ruin, downfall, or failure. Primarily heard in Australia. For years, tech pundits have been pointing the bone at virtual reality technology, announcing its imminent death or decline. People pointed the bone at him when he presented such wild ideas, but they all proved to be wildly successful.
2. To cast blame or aspersions on someone. Primarily heard in Australia. Instead of simply pointing the bone at anyone who doesn't share your opinion, why not try seeing how you can help others understand your position? It's a bit ironic to hear politicians pointing the bone at these industries, when not five years ago they were in those same companies' pockets.
See also: bone, point

point the finger at (one)

To indicate that one is guilty of (doing) something; to blame or accuse one of (doing) something. She'll say that she doesn't blame anyone, but I know that, in her heart, she points the finger at me. Now, I'm not pointing the finger at anyone in particular, but someone here has been stealing food from the communal refrigerator.
See also: finger, point

point to (someone or something)

1. To indicate or signify the direction or location of someone or something. We've set up arrows pointing to the house to help guests who are unfamiliar with the area. If you rest the needle on the surface of water, it will point to magnetic north.
2. To make a physical signal, especially with one's index finger, to indicate the direction or location of someone or something. Tom pointed to the trees behind the cabin when Peter asked where the bathroom was. Everyone pointed to Sarah when the boss asked who had broken the printer.
3. To face the direction of someone or something. I love that the back porch points to the setting sun in the evening. You always want the front of your body pointing to the audience, otherwise they will have trouble hearing you.
4. To move something so that it faces the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "to." He pointed his light to the window so that she would see it from her bedroom. She pointed the stereo to the meeting room so we could all hear the outcome of the game.
5. To draw someone's attention toward or inform someone about the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "to." Excuse me, could you please point me to the train station? He pointed me to the exit when I asked if they had any job openings.
6. To indicate, reveal, suggest, or imply that someone or something is the likely conclusion or answer to some question. After a careful investigation, all signs point to Mr. Walker as the perpetrator of the theft. The unusual angle of this wound points to the second shooter from a higher level.
7. To draw someone's attention toward or inform someone the likely conclusion or answer to some question. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "to." Several interviews pointed police to the location of the suspect, who had been hiding out in a relative's cabin in the woods.
See also: point, to

point to (someone or something) as (something)

To indicate, identify, suggest, or imply that someone or something is the likely conclusion or answer to some question. After a careful investigation, all signs point to Mr. Walker as the perpetrator of the theft. All of our research is pointing to this as the next hot thing for the holidays.
See also: point, to

point toward (someone or something)

1. To indicate or signify the direction or location of someone or something. We've set up arrows pointing toward the house to help guests who are unfamiliar with the area. If you rest the needle on the surface of water, it will point toward magnetic north.
2. To make a physical signal, especially with one's index finger, to indicate the direction or location of someone or something. Tom pointed toward the trees behind the cabin when Peter asked where the bathroom was. Everyone pointed toward Sarah when the boss asked who had broken the printer.
3. To face the direction of someone or something. We want the back porch to be pointing toward the point on the horizon where the sun sets. You always want the front of your body pointing toward the audience, otherwise they will have trouble hearing you.
4. To move something so that it faces the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "toward." He pointed his light toward the window so that she would see it from her bedroom. She pointed the stereo toward the meeting room so we could all hear the outcome of the game.
5. To draw someone's attention toward or inform someone about the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "toward." Excuse me, could you please point me toward the train station? He pointed me toward the exit when I asked if they had any job openings.
See also: point, toward

point up

To identify, draw attention to, and emphasize something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "up." I'm not causing the problems, I'm just pointing them up. The senator pointed up the various difficulties of trying to get such legislation through congress.
See also: point, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

point at someone or something

 
1. [for someone] to direct an extended finger at someone or something; to point one's finger at someone or something. You should not point at people. Harry pointed at the mess Jerry had made and scowled.
2. [for something] to aim at someone or something. The gun pointed directly at him. He was frightened. The sign pointed at a small roadside cafe, populated by truck drivers.
See also: point

point someone or something out

to select or indicate someone or something (from a group). Everyone pointed the error out. She pointed out the boy who took her purse.
See also: out, point

point something at someone or something

to aim or direct something at someone or something. Don't ever point a gun at anyone! Point the rifle at the target and putt the trigger.
See also: point

point something up

 
1. Fig. to emphasize something; to emphasize one aspect of something. This is a very important thing to learn. Let me point it up one more time by drawing this diagram on the board. This points up what I've been telling you.
2. Fig. to tuck-point something; to repair the joints in masonry. I hired someone to point the chimney up. Carl pointed up the brick wall.
See also: point, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

point out

Identify or bring to notice, as in He pointed out the oldest buildings in the city, or She pointed out an error in our reasoning. [Late 1400s]
See also: out, point

point up

Emphasize, draw attention to, as in Her comments point up the need for more security at the store. [First half of 1900s]
See also: point, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

point out

v.
To bring something to the attention of others; indicate something: No one likes him because he always points out everyone's mistakes. As we drove by her old house, she pointed it out to me.
See also: out, point
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems too, therefore, that the pointedness of these yoked
(20) So too is there an oblique pointedness in the deposition's dirge-like refrain of the phrase "the generous Captain Amasa Delano." There are, in all, six full reiterations of the exact phrase "the generous Captain Amasa Delano," punctuated by a final and not-so-faintly damning reference to "the generosity and piety of Amasa Delano incapable of sounding such wickedness" (108-12).
One could say that John Koch (1909-1978) painted as if modernism--Manet included --simply never occurred, but such a statement fails to account for the vehemence of his rejection of most twentieth-century art and the pointedness of his rebellion against it.
(7) As Vine Deloria points out, it is tempting to read too much into Native American tribal traditions, "to romanticize [them] and make it seem that they had more power and insight than they were capable of producing." (8) It is equally tempting to read too little in them and to overlook their pointedness and particularity and so eliminate what Gerald Torres and Kathryn Milun call "differences the dominant culture perceives as destabilizing." (9) Readers will justly resist such temptations.
But "a pointedness in his manner of asking her, which she did not like," disturbs Fanny--and rightly, for his soliciting her hand in the dance is a prelude to his soliciting her hand in marriage.
What looks back at us in the hardness and the blackness of that gaze, the harshness and staccato pointedness of that gesture?
Teacher education faculty in SCDEs must demonstrate the necessity and relevancy of pedagogical knowledge and skill, the aptness of child and adolescent studies, the pointedness of knowledge of the history of education.
Point out that triangles may vary in orientation, size, symmetry, and "pointedness."
But this moves the focus too quickly away from the specific issue being addressed (forms of ethnocentric covenantalism in Early Judaism), thereby blunting the pointedness of Paul's concerns in the process.
Although Hill has drawn criticism for his conservative views, one must regard him as a conservative in a literal sense, one who is interested in "conserving," among other things, an indigenous English cultural tradition that, like the austere verticality and pointedness of Christian architecture, he sees as deriving from and originating in the geographic features and climatic conditions of the country.
Axiom of Pointedness. There is a single type [perpendicular to] in T that is the subtype of all types in T.
While not deteriorating into mutual ad hominems, frequently contemporary disputes are articulated with a pointedness that until now has been somewhat unusual.
[] The economy of expression conventionally attributed to minor forms is possible only by virtue of the pith and pointedness of their wording.
Time and again this enables him to demonstrate a richness of texture, subtlety of manner, and pointedness of purpose hitherto undetected.
The political pointedness of the authorial interventions increases in later books of The Empire City.