pointed

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point out

1. To bring attention to someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "out." She always points out my mistakes in front of the boss to make me look bad. Oh, that's interesting. I never would have noticed if you hadn't pointed it out. I'd just like to point out that Regina deserves most of the credit for the design—I just helped her revise it.
2. To identify someone or something within a group or crowd. A noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "out." The witness came to the police station and pointed the suspect out from a lineup. Just point out which ones you want and I'll wrap them up for you.
See also: out, point

point up

To identify, draw attention to, and emphasize something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "up." I'm not causing the problems, I'm just pointing them up. The senator pointed up the various difficulties of trying to get such legislation through congress.
See also: point, up

point (one) in the right direction

To give someone guidance, advice, or information that helps guide them toward a successful achievement, outcome, or resolution. We're hopeful that our financial planning services can help point people in the right direction when they look to buy their first home. I was at a loss how to proceed with the project. Thankfully, Janet was able to point me in the right direction.
See also: direction, point, right

point the bone at (someone or something)

1. To predict someone's or something's ruin, downfall, or failure. Primarily heard in Australia. For years tech pundits have been pointing the bone at virtual reality technology, announcing its imminent death or decline. And yet, here we are, with VR still as popular as ever. People pointed the bone at him when he presented such wild ideas, but they all proved to be wildly successful.
2. To cast blame or aspersions on someone. Primarily heard in Australia. Instead of simply pointing the bone at anyone who doesn't share your opinion or way of thinking, why not try seeing how you can help others understand your position? It's a bit ironic to hear these politicians pointing the bone at these industries, when not five years ago they were in those same companies' pockets.
See also: bone, point

point to (someone or something)

1. To indicate or signify the direction or location of someone or something. We've set up arrows pointing to the house to help guests who are unfamiliar with the area. If you rest the needle on the surface of water, it will point to magnetic north.
2. To make a physical signal, especially with one's index finger, to indicate the direction or location of someone or something. Tom pointed to the trees behind the cabin when Peter asked where the bathroom was. Everyone pointed to Sarah when the boss asked who had broken the printer.
3. To face the direction of someone or something. I love that the back porch points to the setting sun in the evening. You always want the front of your body pointing to the audience, otherwise they will have trouble hearing you.
4. To move something so that it faces the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "to." He pointed his light to the window so that she would see it from her bedroom. She pointed the stereo to the meeting room so we could all hear the outcome of the game.
5. To draw someone's attention toward or inform someone about the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "to." Excuse me, could you please point me to the train station? He pointed me to the exit when I asked if they had any job openings.
6. To indicate, reveal, suggest, or imply that someone or something is the likely conclusion or answer to some question. After a careful investigation, all signs point to Mr. Walker as the perpetrator of the theft. The unusual angle of this wound points to the second shooter from a higher level.
7. To draw someone's attention toward or inform someone the likely conclusion or answer to some question. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "to." Several interviews pointed police to the location of the suspect, who had been hiding out in a relative's cabin in the woods.
See also: point

point toward (someone or something)

1. To indicate or signify the direction or location of someone or something. We've set up arrows pointing toward the house to help guests who are unfamiliar with the area. If you rest the needle on the surface of water, it will point toward magnetic north.
2. To make a physical signal, especially with one's index finger, to indicate the direction or location of someone or something. Tom pointed toward the trees behind the cabin when Peter asked where the bathroom was. Everyone pointed toward Sarah when the boss asked who had broken the printer.
3. To face the direction of someone or something. We want the back porch to be pointing toward the point on the horizon where the sun sets. You always want the front of your body pointing toward the audience, otherwise they will have trouble hearing you.
4. To move something so that it faces the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "toward." He pointed his light toward the window so that she would see it from her bedroom. She pointed the stereo toward the meeting room so we could all hear the outcome of the game.
5. To draw someone's attention toward or inform someone about the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "toward." Excuse me, could you please point me toward the train station? He pointed me toward the exit when I asked if they had any job openings.
See also: point, toward

point someone or something out

to select or indicate someone or something (from a group). Everyone pointed the error out. She pointed out the boy who took her purse.
See also: out, point

point something up

 
1. Fig. to emphasize something; to emphasize one aspect of something. This is a very important thing to learn. Let me point it up one more time by drawing this diagram on the board. This points up what I've been telling you.
2. Fig. to tuck-point something; to repair the joints in masonry. I hired someone to point the chimney up. Carl pointed up the brick wall.
See also: point, up

point out

Identify or bring to notice, as in He pointed out the oldest buildings in the city, or She pointed out an error in our reasoning. [Late 1400s]
See also: out, point

point up

Emphasize, draw attention to, as in Her comments point up the need for more security at the store. [First half of 1900s]
See also: point, up

point out

v.
To bring something to the attention of others; indicate something: No one likes him because he always points out everyone's mistakes. As we drove by her old house, she pointed it out to me.
See also: out, point
References in periodicals archive ?
20) So too is there an oblique pointedness in the deposition's dirge-like refrain of the phrase "the generous Captain Amasa Delano.
e] (t) Minimal Axiom of Inheritance*, Axiom of Interface* Closed Minimal + Axiom of Closure Native Minimal + Axiom of Nativeness Lattice Minimal + Axiom of Supertype Lattice* Direct supertyped Lattice + Axiom of Supertypes Acyclic Lattice + Axiom of Acyclicity* Rooted Lattice + Axiom of Rootedness Pointed Lattice + Axiom of Pointedness
Due to the axiom of pointedness, which Tigukat obeys, the new type t is added to P[sub.
Furthermore, the Axiom of Rootedness is obeyed with T = OBJECT and the Axiom of Pointedness is relaxed since there is no single class as a base.
While not deteriorating into mutual ad hominems, frequently contemporary disputes are articulated with a pointedness that until now has been somewhat unusual.
The economy of expression conventionally attributed to minor forms is possible only by virtue of the pith and pointedness of their wording.
Time and again this enables him to demonstrate a richness of texture, subtlety of manner, and pointedness of purpose hitherto undetected.
The political pointedness of the authorial interventions increases in later books of The Empire City.
Having been circulated around the world, the letter including has been almost universally praised for its pointedness and humour.
To describe the dead as aphades, therefore, is not merely to suggest that they lack basic awareness, or simple perception, but more precisely, that they are "incapable of intending," that they lack the mental pointedness and focus that constitute genuine agency.
Peter Kazaras's Loge, sung with pointedness and wit, took over the stage (as he should) on his appearances, while Richard Paul Fink's Alberich, thankfully not caricatured either in costume or demeanor (the costumer was Martin Pakledinaz), projected greed and evil through force of presence.
He might have been signifying by it the sharp corners and hard edges, all the stony pointedness, the grand right geometry of his spreading Palladian church" (1:137).
It's all a function of focus," and, "the one pointedness is the key.
Balancing this gruesome rhetorician's philosophies are scenes of comic pointedness and simple elegance.
We do not have the text that Chesterfield saw, and the reply got all the mythologizing that goes with oral tradition, a tradition orchestrated by its author, and (who knows) perhaps even adorned at the edges by an embroidery of added pointedness or some wishful afterthought.