pointed

(redirected from pointedly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

point (one) in the right direction

1. Literally, to show one the correct route, often by actually pointing in the direction of the desired destination. A: "I think I'm close to Suite 200, but I haven't been able to find it. Can you point me in the right direction?" B: "Sure—walk straight that way and it will be on your left."
2. By extension, to give one advice or information that helps guide them toward a desired outcome or course of action. We're hopeful that our financial planning services can help point people in the right direction when they look to buy their first home. I was at a loss as to how to proceed with the project, but thankfully Janet was able to point me in the right direction.
See also: direction, point, right

point at

1. To extend one's finger, especially the index finger, in the direction of someone or something. The librarian pointed at the sign that said to keep quiet. "There he is! That's the guy who mugged me, officer!" I said, pointing to the man crossing the street.
2. To direct, aim, or indicate at or in the direction of someone or something. We set up signs pointing at the house so no one would get lost on their way to the party. The GPS marker pointed at a rest stop a few miles from where we were.
3. To direct or aim someone or something in the direction of someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "point" and "at." Don't point that thing at me—the radiation off those devices causes cancer! I turned her around and pointed her at the rack of books labeled "Computer Sciences." He pointed his rifle at the deer, but he couldn't bring himself to pull the trigger.
4. To indicate some particular outcome, possibility, interpretation, etc. All these signs point at a renewed interest in the market for these sorts of devices. The patterns of the killings point at a single murder who has developed a particular MO.
See also: point

point down to (someone or something)

To direct, aim, or indicate directly downward in the direction of someone or something. You need to put up a sign that points down to your shop or something, because it's impossible to find your place when you walk by! He pointed down to a man on the ground floor when I asked who was in charge of security in the mall.
See also: down, point

point out

1. To bring attention to someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "out." She always points out my mistakes in front of the boss to make me look bad. Oh, that's interesting. I never would have noticed if you hadn't pointed it out. I'd just like to point out that Regina deserves most of the credit for the design—I just helped her revise it.
2. To identify someone or something within a group or crowd. A noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "out." The witness came to the police station and pointed the suspect out from a lineup. Just point out which ones you want and I'll wrap them up for you.
See also: out, point

point Percy at the porcelain

slang To urinate. Typically said of a male. Primarily heard in Australia. Be right back, I've gotta go point Percy at the porcelain.
See also: point, porcelain

point the bone at (someone or something)

1. To predict someone's or something's ruin, downfall, or failure. Primarily heard in Australia. For years, tech pundits have been pointing the bone at virtual reality technology, announcing its imminent death or decline. People pointed the bone at him when he presented such wild ideas, but they all proved to be wildly successful.
2. To cast blame or aspersions on someone. Primarily heard in Australia. Instead of simply pointing the bone at anyone who doesn't share your opinion, why not try seeing how you can help others understand your position? It's a bit ironic to hear politicians pointing the bone at these industries, when not five years ago they were in those same companies' pockets.
See also: bone, point

point to (someone or something)

1. To indicate or signify the direction or location of someone or something. We've set up arrows pointing to the house to help guests who are unfamiliar with the area. If you rest the needle on the surface of water, it will point to magnetic north.
2. To make a physical signal, especially with one's index finger, to indicate the direction or location of someone or something. Tom pointed to the trees behind the cabin when Peter asked where the bathroom was. Everyone pointed to Sarah when the boss asked who had broken the printer.
3. To face the direction of someone or something. I love that the back porch points to the setting sun in the evening. You always want the front of your body pointing to the audience, otherwise they will have trouble hearing you.
4. To move something so that it faces the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "to." He pointed his light to the window so that she would see it from her bedroom. She pointed the stereo to the meeting room so we could all hear the outcome of the game.
5. To draw someone's attention toward or inform someone about the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "to." Excuse me, could you please point me to the train station? He pointed me to the exit when I asked if they had any job openings.
6. To indicate, reveal, suggest, or imply that someone or something is the likely conclusion or answer to some question. After a careful investigation, all signs point to Mr. Walker as the perpetrator of the theft. The unusual angle of this wound points to the second shooter from a higher level.
7. To draw someone's attention toward or inform someone the likely conclusion or answer to some question. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "to." Several interviews pointed police to the location of the suspect, who had been hiding out in a relative's cabin in the woods.
See also: point

point to (someone or something) as (something)

To indicate, identify, suggest, or imply that someone or something is the likely conclusion or answer to some question. After a careful investigation, all signs point to Mr. Walker as the perpetrator of the theft. All of our research is pointing to this as the next hot thing for the holidays.
See also: point

point toward (someone or something)

1. To indicate or signify the direction or location of someone or something. We've set up arrows pointing toward the house to help guests who are unfamiliar with the area. If you rest the needle on the surface of water, it will point toward magnetic north.
2. To make a physical signal, especially with one's index finger, to indicate the direction or location of someone or something. Tom pointed toward the trees behind the cabin when Peter asked where the bathroom was. Everyone pointed toward Sarah when the boss asked who had broken the printer.
3. To face the direction of someone or something. We want the back porch to be pointing toward the point on the horizon where the sun sets. You always want the front of your body pointing toward the audience, otherwise they will have trouble hearing you.
4. To move something so that it faces the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "toward." He pointed his light toward the window so that she would see it from her bedroom. She pointed the stereo toward the meeting room so we could all hear the outcome of the game.
5. To draw someone's attention toward or inform someone about the direction of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "toward." Excuse me, could you please point me toward the train station? He pointed me toward the exit when I asked if they had any job openings.
See also: point, toward

point up

To identify, draw attention to, and emphasize something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "point" and "up." I'm not causing the problems, I'm just pointing them up. The senator pointed up the various difficulties of trying to get such legislation through congress.
See also: point, up

point at someone or something

 
1. [for someone] to direct an extended finger at someone or something; to point one's finger at someone or something. You should not point at people. Harry pointed at the mess Jerry had made and scowled.
2. [for something] to aim at someone or something. The gun pointed directly at him. He was frightened. The sign pointed at a small roadside cafe, populated by truck drivers.
See also: point

point someone or something out

to select or indicate someone or something (from a group). Everyone pointed the error out. She pointed out the boy who took her purse.
See also: out, point

point something at someone or something

to aim or direct something at someone or something. Don't ever point a gun at anyone! Point the rifle at the target and putt the trigger.
See also: point

point something up

 
1. Fig. to emphasize something; to emphasize one aspect of something. This is a very important thing to learn. Let me point it up one more time by drawing this diagram on the board. This points up what I've been telling you.
2. Fig. to tuck-point something; to repair the joints in masonry. I hired someone to point the chimney up. Carl pointed up the brick wall.
See also: point, up

point out

Identify or bring to notice, as in He pointed out the oldest buildings in the city, or She pointed out an error in our reasoning. [Late 1400s]
See also: out, point

point up

Emphasize, draw attention to, as in Her comments point up the need for more security at the store. [First half of 1900s]
See also: point, up

point out

v.
To bring something to the attention of others; indicate something: No one likes him because he always points out everyone's mistakes. As we drove by her old house, she pointed it out to me.
See also: out, point
References in periodicals archive ?
But pointedly, the club's bankers have expressed their satisfaction at what they have seen.
Sabbath is rightly connected here with the public circumstances of the poor and the hungry, because the sabbath rest that YHWH commands us to observe this day (Exod 20:8-11) intends for sabbath to foster a society in which people do not simply (and mindlessly) identify themselves as "producers" or, more pointedly, as "consumers." Instead, those to whom YHWH speaks are the precious descendants of Jacob, and of Rachel and Leah, for whom the Lord wants strength and growth.
And Blair pointedly notes that managing editor Gerald Boyd was "raised by his grandmother after his mother died following a long struggle with drugs"--which might qualify as an especially nasty piece of personal disclosure except for the fact that it's not true.
She tells the Cardiff West AM pointedly: 'I always feel like I want to go cut your hair.'
In no instance more pointedly, perhaps, than in the pair of compelling essays on Jessica by Joan Ozark Holmer and John Drakakis.
"[The Democrats] see this as a critical difference between themselves and what the Bush administration is doing or, more pointedly, what the Bush administration is not doing," said former Clinton education adviser Robert Shireman.
However, the Union Jack incorporates the flags of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, pointedly omitting ours.
His hosts, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and wife Doris, pointedly ignored his matching shirt and trousers.
Other chapters focus pointedly on racial issues: interracial friendships, racism and cultural pride.
Oklahoma born and bred, J Mays, Ford's vice president of Design since 1997, left home after an unsuccessful stint studying journalism at the University of Oklahoma ("Unlike a lot of people, being useless at it stopped me from pursuing journalism as a career," he says pointedly.), and headed west to California.
The standard objection to Maimonides is that his view is so extreme that it undermines important features of religious life, most pointedly the institution of prayer.
I'm thinking of a poem like "Nights and Days of Nineteen-Something" most pointedly, in which the speaker's sexual escapades don't mesh with the word choice and rhyme used to explicate them.
When asked to name his competitors, O'Connell pointedly said John Hancock is not one, and he predicted that company "will be a division of some other company" someday--a reference to the fact that attractive stock companies are vulnerable to takeovers, while mutuals are not.
EMC also offers an optional Symmetrix Data Migration Services (SDMS) for moving files off of what a spec-sheet pointedly calls "aging mainframe disk devices" and onto new Symmetrix systems.
As Davin pointedly argues, "the term 'children' denied difference." (199-200)