point of departure


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point of departure

1. Literally, the point from which one begins one's journey. All customers are being advised that the point of departure for the 3:30 tour bus has been changed.
2. By extension, the point from which further discussion, activity, progress, development, etc., takes place. We are hopeful that this summit will act as a point of departure for future policies dealing with the threat of climate change.
See also: departure, of, point

a ˌpoint of deˈparture


1 a place where a journey starts
2 (formal) an idea, a theory or an event that is used to start a discussion, an activity, etc: Professor Brown’s recent article will certainly be the point of departure for future research on the subject.
See also: departure, of, point
References in periodicals archive ?
This formula -- high-end residential buildings adjacent to the point of departure -- is so simple it is almost obvious, especially now as the inflated real estate market in Manhattan forces people to live in edge cities like Yonkers.
"How could it be that a country as civilized as Germany...?" This classic incredulity over the Holocaust easily could be the point of departure in pondering how Japanese soldiers ("honorary Aryans," in Hitler's eyes) could have maimed, raped, tortured, and murdered so many unarmed civilians of all ages.
Since then it has been the point of departure for four satellites launched as part of the San Marco Project, a cooperative atmospheric-research program of the University of Rome's Aerospace Research Center and NASA.
JKIA has achieved 'Last Point of Departure' status to allow the airport facilitate direct flights between Kenya and the US, Kenya Airports Authority has said.
If the reason for a flight being axed is "within the airline's control", it must pay compensation, offering a refund, a free flight back to the initial point of departure or alternative transport to the final destination.
This month, Oregon Ballet Theatre is debuting a new bolero--or rather, a new interpretation of Ravel's famous "Bolero." The Brooklyn choreographer Nicolo Fonte uses the idea of "relentless beauty" as a point of departure. Also on the all-French composers program is a new pas de deux evoking 19th-century Paris by Christopher Stowell, and two company premieres: Stowell's Zais, inspired by the court of Versailles, and Robbins' iconic Afternoon of a Faun to Debussy.
A ground stop cuts incoming flights by holding aircraft on the ground at their point of departure.
These harsh, not very appealing images contrast with another series of photographs, enormous in size, exhibited at the gallery entrance--a new work, VB53: Giardino dei Boboli, Firenze, 2005, created with the Florentine performance as a point of departure but tied to it only thematically.
Two years ago, it was sensitively converted into a stylish boutique hotel, with a two-storey wing of galleries, making it an ideal point of departure for an architectural pilgrimage.
Besprochene und erzahlte Welt (Stuttgart, 1971), which was translated into French as Le Temps: le recit et le commentaire (Paris, 1973), could have been an effective theoretical point of departure to foster the close readings this book seldom offers.
Simone Weil's Gravity and Grace is examined, and her penchant for the use of the concept of the void as a point of departure for metaphysical speculation, while Simone de Beauvoir's work Old Age is analyzed, with a view toward setting out her use of the Sartrean concept of project.
Her carefully researched and documented book with its excellent bibliography will be a point of departure for all future researchers.
Using David Leonard's article, "Using the Web for Graduate Courses in Technical Communication with Distant Learners," as a point of departure, this paper examines variations of Leonard's four factors that contribute to the success of a Web-based course in light of an online Introduction to Technical Writing course designed and taught by the author.
Tribe claims to "share with Justice Scalia the belief that the Constitution's written text has primacy and must be deemed the ultimate point of departure." Dworkin calls the idea of a nontextualist Constitution "hardly even intelligible" and huffily denies that he, or Brennan, or anybody else, ever endorsed such a notion.
Woodson's The African Background Outlined would have been the ideal point of departure for discussion of what Logan makes of important aspects of African culture in American slavery, a subject of great concern in American history at this hour.