pocket veto

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pocket veto

1. noun The indirect but effective or implicit prevention of a legislative bill from becoming law by declining to return it to congress or parliament until they have been adjourned. In the United States, this adjournment must occur within ten days of the bill being passed to the president for signing. The president has made it clear that he will exercise a pocket veto on any funding bill that does not meet his demands for increases in the military budget.
2. verb To indirectly prevent a legislative bill from becoming law by such means. Though the president claims to have pocket vetoed the bill, the speaker of the house made it clear that the congressional recess would not happen before the tenth day required, and thus the bill would be returned to congress and remain open to an override vote.
See also: pocket

pocket veto

The implied veto of a bill by the President of the United States or by a state governor or other executive who simply holds the bill without signing it until the legislature has adjourned. For example, The President used the pocket veto to kill the crime bill. This expression dates from the 1830s and alludes to putting the unsigned bill inside one's pocket.
See also: pocket
References in periodicals archive ?
The combination of the Kennedy ruling, the Ford administration's unwillingness to appeal Kennedy, and these five allegedly "return" pocket vetoes sparked some public attention.
In a final twist, Bork authored a memo to Ford Attorney General Edward Levi on January 26, 1976, in which he now argued that they should abandon their effort to resist the Kennedy rule as well as attempts to exercise intrasession and intersession pocket vetoes. On January 29, 1976, Levi authored a memo to Ford making the same recommendation, which ended the pocket veto dispute.
During his presidency, Ronald Reagan did not attempt any intrasession pocket vetoes or protective returns but did pocket veto two bills during intersession breaks.
The first Bush administration significantly escalated the pocket veto debate by arguing for intrasession, as well as intersession, pocket vetoes (Spitzer 2001, 726-27).
If enacted, the bill would have limited pocket vetoes to final, sine die adjournments at the end of a Congress.
The Kennedy (1974) case suggested that pocket vetoes no longer made sense during intrasession and intersession adjournments.
Appendix: "Protective Return" Pocket Vetoes, 1974-2010 President Bill Vetoed by "Protective Return" Bill Number Ford National Wildlife Refuge H.R.
Even though Bush called these two actions pocket vetoes by saying that bill return was impossible based on the meaning of the Article I, section 7 veto paragraph, he nevertheless did the impossible and returned the two bills to Congress.
1976]), in which the appeals court ruled that pocket vetoes could only be used after sine die adjournments unless Congress failed to designate an agent to receive veto messages (the administration decided against an appeal).
Bearing in mind the earlier discussion about the bases of the regular and pocket vetoes as well as the extant case law, several conclusions arise from this presidential gamesmanship over pocket veto use:
The arguments in favor of sine die--only pocket vetoes are not only constitutional (as several courts have noted), but sensible.
Admittedly, Congress could avoid at least some potential pocket vetoes through careful timing of its presentment of enrolled bills.
The logic of parallel flexibility applied to congressional receipt of vetoed legislation supports the argument for sine die-only pocket vetoes.