pocket veto


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Related to pocket veto: Signing statement

pocket veto

1. noun The indirect but effective or implicit prevention of a legislative bill from becoming law by declining to return it to congress or parliament until they have been adjourned. In the United States, this adjournment must occur within ten days of the bill being passed to the president for signing. The president has made it clear that he will exercise a pocket veto on any funding bill that does not meet his demands for increases in the military budget.
2. verb To indirectly prevent a legislative bill from becoming law by such means. Though the president claims to have pocket vetoed the bill, the speaker of the house made it clear that the congressional recess would not happen before the tenth day required, and thus the bill would be returned to congress and remain open to an override vote.
See also: pocket

pocket veto

The implied veto of a bill by the President of the United States or by a state governor or other executive who simply holds the bill without signing it until the legislature has adjourned. For example, The President used the pocket veto to kill the crime bill. This expression dates from the 1830s and alludes to putting the unsigned bill inside one's pocket.
See also: pocket
References in periodicals archive ?
This circumstance is then modified by the phrase, "unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return," in which case any bill not signed by the president is vetoed by pocket veto, even though it is not returned to Congress.
Obama's second veto, on October 8, 2010, was also a protective return pocket veto. This time, the veto garnered more public attention--although news reports were laced with inaccuracies (1)--as H.R.
The pocket veto can be an equally powerful tool in business.
The President constitutionally must have the power to veto the result of any impeachment trial (subject to two-thirds override by both houses) and to pocket veto lame duck impeachments.
Each founder was given a pocket veto in the decision-making process, which helped foster trust and collaboration.
The text does not indicate, for example, the lengthy recess, or -- analogous to the Pocket Veto Clause(172) -- a recess preventing Senate confirmation, phrases that might lead to line-drawing problems because of their qualifications of the Recess.
Their work was undone, however, when President Bush exercised a surprise pocket veto of the measure, proving that little has changed in the executive branch as a result of the Iran/contra scandal.
264), the long-awaited legislation died from a pocket veto by the President.
In his opinion, with the pocket veto, the president can undermine the Macedonian Parliament's powers anytime he wants.
Seventeen of them were pocket vetoed which means they died without any action hence "pocket veto."
This is termed a "pocket veto;" see CRS Report RS22188, Regular Vetoes and Pocket Vetoes: An Overview, by Kevin R.
One change, the elimination of the pocket veto, would restore greater balance between the executive and the legislative branches.
Of the uncertain vetoes in the 100th Congress, one, limiting advertising on children's television, was a pocket veto in Reagan's last year, meaning there could be no SVB.
presidential "pocket veto" of legislation, (220) congressional
Thus, Bork has held that the homeless have no right to challenge a decision by the Administration not to establish a "model shelter' as promised; that Medicare patients may not challenge an effort of the Department of Health and Human Services to prevent the courts from reviewing denials of claims; that Haitian refugees may not challenge a government policy of stopping refugees on the high seas; and that Congressmen may not challenge the President's use of the pocket veto.