pock


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pock (something) with (something else)

1. To mar some surface with many small dents, divots, pits, or other similar imperfections. Often used in passive constructions. Our neighbors' son pocked our pristine front yard with divots after he decided to practice his golf swing there last weekend. The body of my brand new car was pocked with dents and craters after a bunch of kids threw stones at me as I drove through the east side of town last night.
2. To mar something with multiple imperfections, difficulties, or tribulations. Often used in passive constructions. Our relationship has been pocked with various troubles over the last 15 years, but we've always emerged stronger as a couple in spite of them. Recent reports have begun to pock his once impeccable reputation with accusations of plagiarism and deceit.
See also: pock

pock something with something

to cause dents or small craters by shooting or throwing something at something. The hail pocked the roof of the car with dents. The side of the house was pocked with tiny dents where the hail had struck.
See also: pock
References in periodicals archive ?
Born in Chicago in March of 1959, Pock was drawn to medicine early, initially to her father's field of podiatry.
As Pock got closer to making decisions about her future career, her father noted that there were some limits associated with his line of work, and that there were certain conditions that might initially manifest as a podiatric (foot) disorder, but would require referral to a specialist--typically an internist--for full resolution.
While stationed in Japan, Pock made two trips to China and saw firsthand how some acupuncture techniques were performed.
Pock picked up the puck and made a wrist shot from the left circle that got by Joey MacDonald on the stick side, spoiling the rookie's bid for his first career shutout.
The reformulated shell sand recipe resulted in a cookie that not only solved the pock mark defects but also contained a lower amount of nitrogen.
After June 2002, when new recipe cookies were put into production, pock marks under cookies were reduced or eliminated.
Then Pock, with good switching play, ran in a try and then another from 80 metres.
Half time: Pocklington 12 - 31 Middlesbrough Fezan played well at full back and our midfield defence meant that Pock were kicking a lot.
Pock scored another try and it was real end to end stuff.
Maud's Pink, 1999, for example, a leather floor sculpture at Sean Kelly, coils like a snake or an alien tentacle, pocked with mink-rimmed apertures that might be eyes, genitals, or piscine suckers.
Rosie and the General, Joan, and all the other misfits who represent the decadence of late-20th-century Western culture, are not only prime examples of Bickerton's skill as a social satirist but reflect his abiding interest "in utilizing the process of corruption as a poetic form, as a platform or launching pad for poetic discourse itself." In the "Indonesian paintings," poeticism and truth (and their elusiveness) are the products of a sci-fi Robert Smithson reclamation site, pocked with evolutionary glitches and yawning entropies, where no leap forward from apes to man marks the topography.
This plasticine orb was pocked and protuberant with residues of collective creativity - coral fronds and tendrils, etched hieroglyphs, and a few figurative offerings (a dice with nines on each side, a shark, a motorcar).
The electric and magnetic fields from the laser interfere with those from the light scattering off the spheres, creating a busy electromagnetic landscape pocked with energy wells.
Phosphorus atoms from the hot phosphine fill pocks that form in the lens during processing.
The researchers use a ceramic membrane pocked with tiny, 200-nanometer pores as scaffolding for growing gold microcylinders in an electrochemical bath.