po' boy

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po' boy

A traditional sandwich from New Orleans, Louisiana, made with a long roll of French bread and containing a variety of fillings, almost always with some kind of meat or fried seafood. ("Po' boy" being short for "poor boy," supposedly referring to striking workers in 1929 to whom a local restaurant served such sandwiches.) Primarily heard in US. Ever since leaving New Orleans to go to college, I can't stop craving a proper roast beef po' boy from back home. I'm ordering a dozen po' boys for the party, so if you have any food allergies, let me know this afternoon.
See also: boy

poor boy

verb
See also: boy, poor
References in periodicals archive ?
It all begins when by chance Joe observes two gangbangers beating up a cook in a po'boy sandwich shop in Venice, California.
If steak doesn't whet your appetite then try the deep-fried fish po'boy sarnie, the grilled seabass or the house butcher's salad.
Many essays maintain a friendly, accepting tone: Johnson refers to "our swamp"; she debates the aesthetic versus culinary appeals of her favorite po'boy joints; she explains her role in creating an unofficial but flourishing neighborhood children's library; and she relishes her adopted home.
I had a po'boy that day too, and I rode my black bike across the Marigny and the Bywater in the bottom of night.
A po'boy sandwich is normally made with long loaves of French bread Filled with an assortment of meats with gravy or fried seafood, and dressed with condiments and salads (Figure 6-21).
The communities, large and small, that exist in her 72 distinct neighborhoods are the "meat in the po'boy.
Join the downtown dykes who gather for excellent biodynamic wines and organic grub--from curried plantain dumplings to the barbecued tofu po'boy.
Also in this issue is a look at New Zealand's pinot noir, an up-and-coming variety long overshadowed by the country's sauvignon blanc; Kelly Alexander's look at the fierce cooking competitions of Sweden, with a focus on the Chef of the Year contest; and a Classic column about New Orleans' iconic sandwich, the po'boy.
In the Quarter, you can dine on everything from a po'boy (New Orleans' version of a hero sandwich) to catfish to an unforgettable candle-lit meal prepared by one of the nation's best chefs.
Add a classic remoulade sauce for an appetizer, top greens for a unique Bayou salad, stuff a baguette for a Po'boy sandwich or use for an entree or as part of a combination plate.
Besides blues and jazz, New Orleans also is the birthplace of the po'boy sandwich.
The Po'Boy Pipebursting System from Mole Manufacturing, Inc.
Locals line up at lunch time for such favorites as po'boy sandwiches and Meme's red beans and rice with sausage.
Guests can enjoy crawfish as a meal, combo, or even a Po'Boy.
It features all-you-can-eat fried cod and perch, baked fish, sauted shrimp and pasta, Big Bang Shrimp Po'boy, grilled cheese, pizza, salad bar, soups and all the fixin's.