plunge

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Related to plunges: set out, for the most part, in favor of, up to par, refer to

plunge down (something)

To run, fall, or plummet down something at great, often uncontrollable speed. The bus skidded on the ice and plunged down the side of the ravine. The rollercoaster plunged down the near-vertical drop, making everyone on board scream with delighted terror.
See also: down, plunge

plunge from (something)

To fall or plummet down from something at great, often uncontrollable speed. The man somehow gained access to the roof and plunged from the top of the skyscraper.
See also: plunge

plunge to (something)

To run, fall, or plummet down to some lower level or degree at great, often uncontrollable speed. The bus skidded on the ice and plunged to bottom of the ravine. The stock market plunged to its lowest level in over 50 years.
See also: plunge

plunge to (one's) death

To fall from such a great height that one dies upon impact. The stunt double's safety harness wasn't properly secured, and she ended up plunging to her death when she leapt from the building.
See also: death, plunge

plunge (something) in(to) (someone or something)

To force the full length of something into a person or something else. The workers set about plunging iron rods into the wet concrete. He laughed cruelly before plunging the knife into the woman's back.
See also: plunge

plunge into (something)

1. Literally, to dive into or immerse oneself in a mass of something, typically a body of water. He plunged into the river to try and save his little brother. The detective plunged into the crowd of people in pursuit of the criminal.
2. By extension, to immerse oneself in or become consumed by some activity. The new team plunged into the project, hoping to salvage the work that had already been done. The detective plunged into the crowd of people in pursuit of the criminal.
See also: plunge

plunge down something

to run or fall down something. The car plunged down the hill and ran into a tree at the bottom. The bicyclist plunged down the side of the hill at a great speed.
See also: down, plunge

plunge from something

to fall or flee from something or some place. The eagle plunged from the sky to the lake to capture its prey. Lily plunged from the room in embarrassment.
See also: plunge

plunge in(to something)

to dive or rush into something; to immerse oneself in something. Ned took off his shoes and plunged into the river, hoping to rescue Frank. He plunged into his work and lost track of time.
See also: plunge

plunge something into someone or something

 and plunge something in
to drive or stab something into someone or something. The murderer plunged the knife into his victim. She plunged in the dagger.
See also: plunge

plunge to something

 
1. to fall or drop down to something. The temperature plunged to zero last night. The burning car plunged to the floor of the canyon.
2. to dive or fall to one's death. She walked straight to the edge of the cliff and plunged to her death. The burro slipped and plunged to an untimely end.
See also: plunge

take the plunge

to marry someone. I'm not ready to take the plunge yet. Sam and Mary took the plunge.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

Venture something, commit oneself, as in You've been living together for a year, so when are you going to take the plunge and get married? It is also put as make the plunge, plunge alluding to diving in a body of water. [Mid-1800s]
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

COMMON If you take the plunge, you decide to do something that you have been thinking of doing for some time, even though it is difficult, risky, or unpleasant. Helen decided to take the plunge and turned professional in 1991. Finally, Mona took the plunge. `I have something to tell you,' she said.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

commit yourself to a course of action about which you are nervous. informal
See also: plunge, take

take the ˈplunge

(informal) decide to do something new, difficult or risky, especially after thinking about it for some time: After working for twenty years he’s decided to take the plunge and go back to college. OPPOSITE: get/have cold feet
A plunge is an act of jumping or diving into water.
See also: plunge, take

plunge in

v.
1. To submerge something quickly into something else: The cook plunged the hot eggs in the cold water to stop them from cooking.
2. To jump or throw oneself into something: I walked up to the swimming pool and plunged in.
3. To fall into something: The child slipped and plunged in the well.
See also: plunge

plunge into

v.
1. To fall or dive into some place or thing: I jumped off the diving board and plunged into the warm water.
2. To thrust or throw something forcefully into some place or thing: I plunged the shovel into the soil.
3. To enter earnestly or wholeheartedly into some activity or situation: After the vacation, I plunged into my studies with renewed energy.
4. To send someone or something into some condition or situation: My gambling losses plunged me into debt.
5. To fall into some state or condition: After my divorce, I plunged into a deep depression.
See also: plunge

take the plunge

tv. to marry someone. I’m not ready to take the plunge yet.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

Informal
To begin an unfamiliar venture, especially after hesitating: After a three-year engagement, they're finally taking the plunge.
See also: plunge, take
References in classic literature ?
I was often tempted, when all was at peace around me, and I the only unquiet thing that wandered restless in a scene so beautiful and heavenly--if I except some bat, or the frogs, whose harsh and interrupted croaking was heard only when I approached the shore--often, I say, I was tempted to plunge into the silent lake, that the waters might close over me and my calamities forever.
I feel as if I were walking on the edge of a precipice, towards which thousands are crowding and endeavouring to plunge me into the abyss.
It is the first of 22 Law Enforcement Torch Run Polar Plunges (including 7 in Chicagoland) that will benefit Special Olympics Illinois in February and March around the state.
The Polar Pool is filled from the same water source used for Wachusett snowmaking, so it's going to be one of the coldest plunges anywhere,'' said Michael Smith, Camp Sunshine's Director of Special Events.
Harrington committed to the Polar Plunges in Portland on Jan.
Uncle John's Bathroom Reader Plunges Into Music" enriches the time spent clearing out one's body by filling one's mind with intriguing trivia, facts, and history about the world of music.
I learned so much in those plunges that no other course at (this university) could even remotely compete with.
Much as a movie heroine tumbles off cliffs but routinely manages to grab something to stop her fall, the female worker ants of the species Cephalotes atratus guide their plunges so they typically veer into a tree trunk, according to Stephen P.
2) One of the two small planes crippled in a midair collision plunges into the ocean off Malibu on Sunday.
Invisible Man's identity confusion (and/or fusion--at one point he felt "somehow a part of all of [the names], had become submerged within them and lost" [241]) is narrated as a plunging: He plunges his mind unsuccessfully for his name, and his confusion is troped as an underground or submerged subway that stresses agent-less, chaotic transport over active, participatory self-transformation.
The growth in the market has been tempered by periodic plunges, the largest being the 86-point drop on September 11 and the 45-point drop on January 23, the day that saw the Dow Jones Industrial Average plummet 116 points in just over an hour.
Special Olympics Minnesota hosts Polar Bear Plunges throughout the state, and people are encouraged to donate or participate in the following cities:
This event is one of nine Polar Bear Plunges for Special Olympics Minnesota scheduled across the state this winter.