plow in

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plow in

To plow the soil so as to mix some other substance thoroughly into it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plow" and "in." (Usually spelled "plough" in British English.) You plow in this new kind of insecticide so that the plants are naturally resistant to bugs as they grow. Make sure you plow the fertilizer in before you sow the seeds.
See also: plow
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

plow something in

to work something into soil by plowing. Lay the fertilizer down and plow it in. Plow in the fertilizer as soon as you can.
See also: plow
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Deere, until then the only manufacturer building plows in Moline, called its product "the Moline Plow."
One of the plows in LeCount's collection is an Oliver No.
As a general rule, there is no particular rarity associated with either left-hand or right-hand plows: Most manufacturers produced plows in both versions.
It's not uncommon to find one or two old walking plows in collections of antique farm equipment.
Harold, who displays many of his plows in the Mid-Missouri Antique Power Assn.'s permanent exhibit at the Saline County, Mo., fairgrounds in Marshall, Mo., says he acquired most of his plows at swap meets and auctions, sometimes from individual collectors.
William Parlin began manufacturing steel plows in Canton, 111., in 1842.
Virtually all plow companies (I have catalogs for several dozen dating back to the 1800s), made plows in both left- and right-hand versions.
"Left-hand plows have been used to the exclusion of right-hand plows in the states of Indiana and Ohio, with some overlapping into eastern Indiana and western Pennsylvania.
The leading manufacturer of modern horse-drawn plows, Pioneer Equipment Inc., of Dalton, Ohio, offers walking and sulky plows in both versions.
Beginning in 1793, Jefferson attached his moldboards to plows in lands he tilled in Albemarle and Bedford counties, Va., finding them to be of "practical utility." He incorporated a pointed toe over a square one as suggested by a Pennsylvania agriculturist, thus shortening the plow by six inches.