plow

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plough on

To move, progress, or develop at a slow but constant and deliberate pace, especially that which is menial, time consuming, or tedious. Primarily heard in UK. John: "Hey Steve, what's new?" Steve: "Nothing much, just been ploughing on with research for my thesis." A: "I've still got a ways to go before I'll be finished clearing out debris from the property." B: "Well, just keep ploughing on until you're done!"
See also: on, plough

plow the sands

To do something that seems futile. I know that I'm just plowing the sands by telling you to stay away from that boy, but I'm your father, and I don't want to see you get hurt. That couch will never fit up the steps—tell them to stop plowing the sands!
See also: plow, sand

clean (one's) plow

To deliver a violent and prolonged physical attack. If you humiliate me like this again, I'll clean your plow!
See also: clean, plow

clean someone's plow

Rur. to beat someone up. If Joe crosses me one more time, I'll clean his plow for sure. Somebody must have really cleaned Bill's plow last night. He had two black eyes this morning!
See also: clean, plow

plow into someone or something

to crash into someone or something; to bump hard into someone or something. The car plowed into the ditch. The runner plowed into another player.
See also: plow

plow something back into something

 and plow something back
to put something, such as a profit, back into an investment. We plowed all the profits back into the expansion of the business. Bill and Ted plowed back everything they earned into the company.
See also: back, plow

plow something in

to work something into soil by plowing. Lay the fertilizer down and plow it in. Plow in the fertilizer as soon as you can.
See also: plow

plow something under (something)

to turn something under the surface of soil by plowing. The farmer plowed the wheat stubble under the surface of the soil. The farmer plowed the stubble under.
See also: plow

plow something up

to uncover something by plowing. The farmer plowed some old coins up and took them to the museum to find out what they were. He plowed up some valuable coins.
See also: plow, up

plow through something

 
1. Lit. to move through something such as snow or mud with a plow. The huge truck plowed through the snow-covered streets so traffic could move again.
2. Fig. to work through something with determination. She plowed through the book to learn everything she could. Billy plowed through dinner and ran outside to play.
See also: plow, through

put one's hand to the plow

Fig. to get busy; to help out; to start working. (Alludes to grasping a plow, ready to work the fields.) You should start work now. It's time to put your hand to the plow. Put your hand to the plow and get the job done!
See also: hand, plow, put

plow back

Reinvest earnings or profits in one's business, as in This company plows back half its profits every year. This term transfers the farming practice of turning the soil from top to bottom to financial enterprises. [First half of 1900s]
See also: back, plow

plow into

Strike with force, crash into; also, attack vigorously. For example, The truck plowed into the retaining wall, or Carol plowed into the pile of correspondence. This expression transfers the force of the farmer's plow to other enterprises. [Late 1800s]
See also: plow

plow under

Cause to vanish, overwhelm, as in The independent bookstores are being plowed under by the large chains. This term alludes to the farmer's burying vegetation by turning it into the soil with a plow. [Second half of 1900s]
See also: plow

plow back

v.
To reinvest some earnings or profits in one's business: After plowing back its profits for years, the company finally decided to pay dividends to its investors. The owners plowed the profits back into the business, using the money to buy new equipment.
See also: back, plow

plow into

v.
1. To strike someone or something with force: The truck slid on the ice and plowed into a brick wall.
2. To cause something to strike someone or something with force: The driver plowed the SUV into the wall.
3. To undertake something, as a task, with eagerness and vigor: I went to the library and plowed into my research paper.
4. To invest some amount of money into something: The company plowed its excess cash into stocks. I just plowed $200,000 into a new house.
See also: plow

plow under

v.
1. To work something into the earth by turning up soil over it: Low grain prices have forced many farmers to plow their crops under. Many wetlands were plowed under to make more farmland.
2. To overwhelm someone or something: My teachers have plowed me under with work this week. We were plowed under with dirty laundry.
See also: plow

plowed (under)

mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. They went out and got plowed.
See also: plow

plowed

verb
See also: plow

plowing water

n. wasting time doing something futile. You’re wasting your time. You’re plowing water.
See also: plow, water
References in periodicals archive ?
Garda Plower agreed with Mr Carroll that that there was nothing Mrs Flanagan or Mr O'Brien could do to avoid a collision.
Moylan, who had about 340 contract plowers and 60 pieces of city equipment to clear the more than 500 miles of Worcester's city and private streets, said that over the years, "The willingness of both our own employees to participate in this additional work assignment and also to attract hired contractors to also participate" has become more difficult.
Still, the service might have continued had professional snow plowers and residents from other towns not taken the sand, which was not monitored by DPW personnel.
I too Believe that the life of men who ride horses, herders of cattle on the mountain pasture, plowers of remote Rock-narrowed farms in poverty and freedom, is a good life.
More than half the state's snow plowers are independent contractors, and the department has been "admittedly lax" in checking whether they have workers' compensation premiums, he said.
Indeed, as mentioned, One Hundred Years of Solitude is in many respects the novel that brought this line of Latin American literature, for the moment, to its culmination, the novel that is most identified with Latin America as such, the novel in which Latin Americans learned to see themselves, the novel that may be to Latin American literature and its plowers of the sea what the Quixote is to Spanish literature and its pursuers of the impossible dream.
While plains are being washed with anti-icing, water-alcohol mixture, snow plowers are also constantly working in the airport apron.
Lidio's would like to thank the many snow plowers who keep our roads clear