plot

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brew a plot

To conspire; to devise a secret plan. What are you kids whispering about back there? You better not be brewing a plot! My siblings and I are brewing a plot to surprise our parents with a trip for their anniversary.
See also: brew, plot

lose the plot

1. To act in a disorganized, chaotic, or irrational manner. Primarily heard in UK. Roger seems to have lost the plot ever since his wife died. I'm sorry about last night. I had one too many drinks and just lost the plot.
2. To lose focus on one's primary objective, principle, or task. Primarily heard in UK. Our co-op had a really promising start, but we started catering to individuals too much instead and eventually lost the plot.
See also: lose, plot

the plot thickens

A situation or set of circumstances has become more complex, mysterious, interesting, or difficult to understand. A: "This whole time I presumed he was working for my father, but it turns out my father has never heard of him!" B: "Ooh, the plot thickens!" Now the plot thickens, as police have opened a line of inquiry into the governor's whereabouts on the date of the incident.
See also: plot, thicken

plot against (something or someone)

To join together to form a scheme or plot to foil or defeat someone or something. The group was arrested for plotting against the monarch. His two younger brothers plotted against him to have him removed from the head of the company.
See also: plot

plot (something) out

1. Literally, to plot data points on a graph. If you plot the equation out, you can see that it will approach zero for infinity without ever reaching it. After plotting the results out, it becomes clear that there is definite correlation between the two variables.
2. To create a detailed course or path by which to travel. We need to plot our path out before we start the hike, or we could end up getting lost. The navigation systems on the ship plot out our course automatically, but we can use these charts and the stars in the sky in case the computers fail.
3. To establish or devise the way in which one will do something. We brought together the heads of the departments to plot out the company's course for the next fiscal year. I think we should plot a strategy out in case this turns into a full-blown scandal.
See also: out, plot

brew a plot

Fig. to plot something; to make a plot. The children brewed an evil plot to get revenge on their teacher. We brewed a plot so that we would not have to help with dinner.
See also: brew, plot

plot against someone or something

to make a scheme against someone or something. All the counselors plotted against the czar. We plotted against the opposing party.
See also: plot

plot something on something

to draw a route or outline on something. He plotted the course they would be taking on a map of the area. The captain plotted the course on a chart of the upper reaches of the Nile.
See also: on, plot

plot something out

to map something out; to outline a plan for something. I have an idea about how to remodel this room. Let me plot it out for you. I plotted out my ideas for the room.
See also: out, plot

plot thickens

Things are becoming more complicated or interesting. The police assumed that the woman was murdered by her ex-husband, but he has an alibi. The plot thickens. John is supposed to be going out with Mary, but I saw him last night with Sally. The plot thickens.
See also: plot, thicken

plot with someone

to scheme with someone. Mary looks as though she is plotting with Jerry to make some sort of mischief. I am not plotting with anyone. I am planning everything myself.
See also: plot

plot thickens, the

Circumstances are becoming very complex or mysterious. Today this term is often used ironically or half-humorously, as in His companion wasn't his wife or his partner-the plot thickens. Originally (1671) it described the plot of a play that was overly intricate, and by the late 1800s it was used for increasingly complex mysteries in detective stories.
See also: plot

lose the plot

INFORMAL
COMMON If someone loses the plot, they become confused or crazy, or no longer know how to deal with a situation. Vikram's working so many hours as a junior doctor he's losing the plot completely and keeps mumbling about the people he's killed by falling asleep on the job. Famous people may be reluctant to link themselves with a store group that seems to have lost the fashion plot.
See also: lose, plot

the plot thickens

People say the plot thickens when a situation or series of events starts to become even more complicated or strange. The plot thickens when he finds diamonds worth 6m euros hidden in a box of salt in the dead man's room. At this point the plot thickened further. A link emerged between the attempt to kill the Pope and the kidnapping of the American. Note: This phrase was widely used in 19th century melodramas, or popular plays that involved extreme situations and extreme emotions, and is now used humorously
See also: plot, thicken

lose the plot

lose your ability to understand what is happening; lose touch with reality. informal
1997 Spectator The truth is that we've lost the plot of great painting and have entered a new phase in which the criteria for judging work are…demonstrably shallow and trivial.
See also: lose, plot

the plot thickens

the situation becomes more difficult and complex.
This expression comes from The Rehearsal ( 1671 ), a burlesque drama by George Villiers , 2nd Duke of Buckingham: ‘now the plot thickens very much upon us’.
See also: plot, thicken

lose the ˈplot

(British English, informal) lose your ability to understand or deal with what is happening: You should have seen Jimmy yesterday. I really thought he’d lost the plot! OPPOSITE: get your act together
See also: lose, plot

the plot ˈthickens

(often humorous) used to say that a situation is becoming more complicated and difficult to understand: Aha, so both Karen and Steve had the day off work yesterday? The plot thickens!
See also: plot, thicken

plot against

v.
To establish a plan to overthrow or ruin someone or something: The spies plotted against the government.
See also: plot

plot out

v.
1. To place something on a graph: The students plotted out the equation and determined that it was a parabola. We determined the coordinates and plotted them out on the graph.
2. To establish some plan, path, or course: We plotted out the best route through the mountains. The captain plotted the ship's course out on the chart.
3. To make a thorough analysis of some plan: The governor met with his top advisers to plot out a new strategy. Before we started the company, we spent six months just plotting it out.
See also: out, plot
References in periodicals archive ?
Puke in the Cinema, 1998; Retard, 2000; and Movie Star Junkie, 1997, match-cut frames from a variety of films according to abject subject matter, generating crude and plotless star-studded epics.
But things took an unusual turn in the almost plotless second half, when the mismatched pair inexplicably found themselves inside a strange pod.
It is artful writing to succeed with a plotless story which nevertheless holds readers' interest to the end.
Arthur Saltzman also compellingly limns Gass's philosophy in his plotless novel which draws readers through its 400,000 words by force of eloquence.
In the Victorian era the harlequinade was reduced to a plotless epilogue to the main pantomime, which was often a dramatized fairy tale.
Harvard lecturer Robert Scanlan, in a spellbinding, scene-by-scene exegesis of Kennedy's Funnyhouse of a Negro, argues that, though the work may appear plotless to some, it actually offers a "plot structure .
Throughout this mainly plotless mood-piece, lenser Magela Crosignani's palette of shifting textures and softly glowing colors creates a swoony aura that morphs according to its surroundings, from suffused daylight glancing off the grass to the smoky, bluish haze of a barroom dance floor.
He came up with a postmodern neoclassical plotless masterpiece--still his best work to date--to a score by Thorn Willems, starring Sylvie Guillem and Laurent Hilaire, and called In the middle, somewhat elevated.
It's an episodic, essentially plotless movie - misadventures, romancing, misadventures, romancing - that finally decides to get around to a story 90 minutes into its 2 1/2-hour running time.
There follows a series of refreshingly plotless scenes that do nothing to further the story, but provide priceless insight into the leading characters.
The basically plotless story line comprises three main narratives in the first person.
Baltisberger), are plotless, darkly humorous free-association anecdotes, typically about social misfits and happily disreputable people.
Constituted of dialogues, and aphorisms ("One bottle of Coca-Cola contains more spiritual microbes than all the boatloads of Marx and Engels"), and a protracted postcoital dream (in which Tintin sheds his last vestiges of heroism and settles down to a long unhappy cuckold's life), the plotless, uninflected narrative drones on and on, like a tedious lecture in a hot classroom.
Yet the desired impact is weakened by excess in several departments and an air of predictability as the plotless vignette trudges around well-worn themes.