pleasing

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please the eye

To be particularly attractive to look at; to be aesthetically pleasing. The movie's special effects certainly please the eye, but its woeful lack of a story makes it an absolute bore to endure. We want our school to please the eye so that students feel excited every time they walk through the doors.
See also: eye, please

pleasing to the eye

Particularly attractive to look at; aesthetically pleasing. The movie's special effects are certainly pleasing to the eye, but its woeful lack of a story makes it an absolute bore to endure. We want our school to be pleasing to the eye so that students feel excited every time they walk through the doors.
See also: eye, pleasing

please (oneself)

To do that which fulfills one's own desires, expectations, or ambitions, especially when failing to consider those of anyone else. It really doesn't matter to me how you arrange the furniture in here, so just please yourself! Look, Tom and his wife are always going to please themselves, so don't tie up everything you want to do on this trip with them.
See also: please

ˌplease the ˈeye

be very attractive to look at: We are proud to present our new lunchtime buffet, where we’re sure you will find dishes to please the eye as well as the palate (= they look and taste good).
See also: eye, please
References in periodicals archive ?
This might explain the absence of condition effects for pleasingness (Expt 1 and Russell & Milne, 1997), particularly if these effects are weak, relative to other influences on Pleasingness, and weaker than those for meaningfulness.
In this experiment, then, participants again rated the paintings for either meaningfulness or pleasingness, but each participant rated twice.
On the first occasion, the ratings (either meaningfulness or pleasingness, depending on group) were made under the control condition (no information).
The meaningfulness and pleasingness ratings instructions on the first rating occasion were identical to those used in Expt 1.
The instructions for the pleasingness/description group were identical except that they referred to pleasingness.
The data consisted of the first and second ratings of meaningfulness or pleasingness and the participants' reports of an 'increase', 'decrease' or 'no difference' in meaningfulness or pleasingness on the second occasion of seeing the paintings.
The crucial comparison is between the pleasingness/description and pleasingness/ control conditions, since if the description increases pleasingness, over and above any effect due to repeated rating, the percentage should be significantly higher for the pleasingness/description group.
The pleasingness ratings were analysed by a mixed model ANOVA with condition (two levels: description and control) as a between-participants factor and rating (first and second) and painting (12 levels) as within-participants factors.
As in Expt 1, the main ANOVA revealed pleasingness differences between the paintings: F(5.
Importantly, in this experiment, the provision of information was also associated with a significant increase in pleasingness.
Relationships between judgments of the complexity, pleasingness and interestingness of music.