play

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play

1. n. a strategy; a plan of action. That was a bad play, Bill. We lost the account.
2. n. an attractive investment; a way to make some money in the securities markets. I just heard about a good play in the options market.

play

/act the fool
1. To act in an irresponsible or foolish manner.
2. To behave in a playful or comical manner.
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References in classic literature ?
But although these plays were looked upon as an act of religion, they were not all solemn.
In those early days Latin was the tongue of the Church, and the Miracle plays were at first said in Latin.
Sometimes the entire cycle was still given, like the detached plays, at a single spot, the market-place or some other central square; but often, to accommodate the great crowds, there were several 'stations' at convenient intervals.
All the plays of the cycle were commonly performed in a single day, beginning, at the first station, perhaps as early as five o'clock in the morning; but sometimes three days or even more were employed.
The thought that I was not going to play for myself quite unnerved me.
At last, when ascending to my own room, I succeeded in handing Polina her winnings, and told her that, next time, I should not play for her.
By the very nature of their huge deals and enterprises they had to play fair.
He merely did not elect to choose them for partners in the big game in which he intended to play.
Henry Crawford, who meanwhile had taken up the play, and with seeming carelessness was turning over the first act, soon settled the business.
In those early days I had no philosophized preference for reality in literature, and I dare say if I had been asked, I should have said that the plays of Shakespeare where reality is least felt were the most imaginative; that is the belief of the puerile critics still; but I suppose it was my instinctive liking for reality that made the great Histories so delightful to me, and that rendered "Macbeth" and "Hamlet" vital in their very ghosts and witches.
I have always said no one could play Chopin like Mademoiselle Reisz
He could not play about any more, so he sat in a huge armchair, and watched the children at their games, and admired his garden.
In the middle of a crashing waltz, d'Arnault suddenly began to play softly, and, turning to one of the men who stood behind him, whispered, `Somebody dancing in there.
It was a heart-rending spectacle, but the audience, seeing that the play had stopped, became angry and began to yell:
He became absorbed in trying out the idea, and even borrowed a circus rider whose act was to play the violin while standing on the back of a galloping horse and to throw somersaults on such precarious platform while still playing the violin.