play

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play

1. n. a strategy; a plan of action. That was a bad play, Bill. We lost the account.
2. n. an attractive investment; a way to make some money in the securities markets. I just heard about a good play in the options market.

play

/act the fool
1. To act in an irresponsible or foolish manner.
2. To behave in a playful or comical manner.
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
I met most of my friends on the golf course, some of them I've been playing with for over thirty years!"
While playing off-man coverage, the corner already has a strike against him: he has no idea where the play or the receiver is going.
His playing is just so unique that you kind of have to tailor your playing to his playing.
Playing rigorous sports in the heat requires close monitoring of both body and weather conditions.
In an earlier effort, Schaeffer and his coworkers had created a checker, playing computer program named Chinook, which could beat the world's top players (SN: 7/20/91, p.
Mismatches are more likely to happen when players' ages vary widely (counselors playing with very young campers), or when there is a coed group.
When playing in a competition, no one can always be the winner.
The ranks of professional tennis are sprinkled with champions who honed their skills playing against their siblings while being coached by their parents.
They transcend time, in their understanding and translation of American blues, folk, rock, and old-timey melodies; tone, in a respect for open space within the music and focused playing of their instruments; harmony, in the way their voices blend together so effortlessly; and rhythm, by confidently relying on a synergy and feel that exists amongst hem--they're neither slow nor fast, just perfectly unrestrained.
Playing the Past: Approaches to English Historical Drama 1385-1600.
Moreover, because children with strong social support are more likely to cope more effectively with life stressors than those without such assistance (Compas & Epping, 1993; Prinstein et al., 1996; Vernberg, La Greca, Silverman, & Prinstein, 1996), group or classroom instruction should include cooperative learning activities (Garmston & Wellman, 1999) as well as opportunities for role playing and learning in dyads and triads (Joyce, Weil, & Calhoun, 2000).
At this week's Fourteenth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Providence, R.I., the Hall of Champions event brought together some of the world's top computer programs playing backgammon, bridge, checkers, chess, Go, Othello, and Scrabble.
The authors will review the importance of play in children's lives, discuss different reasons why parents may become anxious about the amount of time their children spend playing at school, outline how play at home and at school differ on several different dimensions and suggest ways that teachers can foster a new appreciation among parents for play in the early childhood curriculum.