plane off

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plane off

To grind, erode, or shave something until it has been totally removed (from something), leaving a smooth surface behind. Originally reserved for references to the carpenter's tool known as a "plane," the phrase is often applied to anything that has a smoothing or erosive force. A noun or pronoun can be used between "plane" and "off." This is just a rough cut of the timber—I still need to plane the imperfections off. The harsh weather planed off the names of those buried in the cemetery from their headstones.
See also: off, plane
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

plane something off

to remove bumps, nicks, or scrapes by planing. Plane the rough places off so the surface will be as smooth as possible. Sam planed off the bumps.
See also: off, plane
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Did they get adequate training in the company's rush to get the planes off the ground?
The council has been testing a machine called a MultiHog Patch Planer, which planes off the road surface to enable a squared-off hole to be filled by a following gang.
"The consultant said the main thing to do is preserve your main runway, maximize your main runway, try to eliminate all forms of obstructions or delays on it, keep planes off it most of the time," Abaya said.
Sana'a: Yemenia Airways has denied charges in a recent media report against it over the crash of one of its planes off the Comoros Islands that killed 152 people in June 30, 2009.
The ship was named after Ramon Alcaraz a Navyman who served in World War II under the direct command of General McArthur and who shot down three low-flying Japanese planes off Batn in January 17, 1942, Valte said.
Herbert Buckle worked on RAF bombers which were adapted to drop lifeboats to the crews of ditched planes off Iceland and Ireland.
She was trained to pull ships and planes off the ocean and all that crazy stuff.
Australia's Qantas Airways has taken one its prestigious Airbus A380 planes off the tarmac for up to a week after engineers found dozens of cracks in wings after a flight was hit by turbulence.
However, those directives limit how Qantas can use its planes, forcing much of its fleet to stay on the ground as it checks and replaces engines, and keeping planes off its longest and most lucrative routes.
"We need to reach a sensible, fair deal, to get this company up and running again, to get passengers flying again, to get all of the planes off the ground."
A rational approach to risk reveals pilots are more at risk of running their planes off a runway than getting into a mid-air collision, but pilots are more concerned about the worst-case scenario of a mid-air collision.
The sounds of the engines, the clang of the bells are heard throughout the ship between the bang of the catapult shooting planes off the deck and the arresting wires catching those planes as they return safely after their sorties.
According to Aero News, this may have had something to do with the company's decision, shortly after the storm, to push planes off to the tarmac rather than canceling flights, as the older airlines did.
Real-life Charlotte Gray, Mireille Herveic, also helped rescue people on board the British troopship the Lancastria when it was bombed by German planes off the Brittany port of Saint-Nazaire in June 1940, a friend revealed.