plain

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Related to plainest: plain-speaking, plained

in plain English

In clear, straightforward, and uncomplicated English. Chronic atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries has stopped oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart, leading to a myocardial infarction. In plain English, you've suffered a heart attack. I wish these software agreements would be written in plain English, rather than this legalese gobbledygook.
See also: English, plain

in plain view

In full, unrestricted view; visibly, openly, or publicly. I can't believe you go outside in plain view of the neighbors with your bathrobe open! Law enforcement spends so much time and resources going after petty criminals, while all these white-collar crooks on Wall Street are swindling people for millions in plain view!
See also: plain, view

plain sailing

Smooth, uninterrupted, and/or easy progress, movement, or development. Now that we've gotten that problem figured out, the project should be plain sailing from here on! We've got about a 13-hour road trip ahead of us, but it looks like plain sailing for most of it.
See also: plain, sailing

make plain

To explain something clearly or make something obvious. I told him that I was going call the cops if he didn't make plain his intentions.
See also: make, plain

plain Jane

A female who is not considered physically attractive by societal standards. Betty always felt like she was a plain Jane, so she was very surprised when the most handsome boy in school asked her to be his prom date.
See also: Jane, plain

be as plain as the nose on (one's) face

To be very obvious or noticeable. Those two have been flirting all afternoon—it's as plain as the nose on your face! In the end, the solution was as plain as the nose on my face.
See also: face, nose, on, plain

be plain sailing

To be smooth, uninterrupted, and/or easy, especially as of progress, travel, or development. Now that we've gotten that problem figured out, the project should be plain sailing from here on! We've got about 13 hours of driving ahead of us, but it looks like most of it is plain sailing.
See also: plain, sailing

*in plain language

 and *in plain English
Fig. in simple, clear, and straightforward language. (*Typically: be ~; put something [into] ~; say something ~; write something ~.) That's too confusing. Please say it again in plain English. Tell me again in plain language.
See also: language, plain

*plain as day

 and *plain as a pikestaff 
1. Cliché very plain and simple. (*Also: as ~.) Although his face was as plain as day, his smile made him look interesting and friendly. Fred: I have a suspicion that Marcia is upset with me. Alan: A suspicion? Come on, Fred, that's been plain as a pikestaff for quite some time! 2. and *plain as the nose On one's face Cliché clear and understandable. (*Also: as ~.) The lecture was as plain as day. No one had to ask questions. Jane: I don't understand why Professor Potter has been so friendly this week. Alan: It's plain as the nose on your face. He wants to be nominated for Professor of the Year.
See also: plain

pure and simple

 and plain and simple
absolutely; without further complication or elaboration. I told you what you must do, and you must do it, pure and simple. Will you kindly explain to me what it is, pure and simple, that I am expected to do? Just tell me plain and simple, do you intend to go or don't you?
See also: and, pure, simple

in plain English

In clear, straightforward language, as in The doctor's diagnosis was too technical; please tell us what he meant in plain English. [c. 1500] Also see in so many words.
See also: English, plain

plain as day

Also, plain as the nose on your face. Very obvious, quite clear, as in It's plain as day that they must sell their house before they can buy another, or It's plain as the nose on your face that she's lying. These similes have largely replaced the earlier plain as a packstaff or pikestaff, from the mid-1500s, alluding to the stick on which a peddler carried his wares over his shoulder. The first term, from the late 1800s, is probably a shortening of plain as the sun at midday; the variant dates from the late 1600s.
See also: plain

plain sailing

Easy going; straightforward, unobstructed progress. For example, The first few months were difficult, but I think it's plain sailing from here on. Alluding to navigating waters free of hazards, such as rocks or other obstructions, this term was transferred to other activities in the early 1800s.
See also: plain, sailing

pure and simple

No more and no less, plainly so, as in This so-called educational video is really a game, pure and simple. This expression is very nearly redundant, since pure and simple here mean "plain" and "unadorned." Oscar Wilde played on it in The Importance of Being Earnest (1895): "The truth is rarely pure and never simple." [Second half of 1800s]
See also: and, pure, simple

plain as day

or

plain as the nose on your face

If something is as plain as day or as plain as the nose on your face, it is very easy to see, or obvious and easy to understand. He was lying there plain as day, in his hospital gown. It's plain as the nose on your face that this company is wildly undervalued. Note: In old-fashioned British English, you can also say that something is plain as a pikestaff. I saw your grandmother this morning, here as plain as a pikestaff, at the foot of my bed. Note: This expression was originally `plain as a packstaff'. A packstaff was a long stick that pedlars used to carry their bundles. The word `pikestaff' was substituted at a later time: a pikestaff was a long walking stick. Both packstaffs and pikestaffs were very plain and simple.
See also: plain

plain sailing

BRITISH or

smooth sailing

AMERICAN
COMMON If an activity or task is plain sailing, it is easy to do or achieve. Once I got used to the diet it was plain sailing and I lost six kilos over a four month period. All of a sudden, my life started to improve, which is not to say that it was all smooth sailing from then on. Note: In American English, you can also use the expressions clear sailing and easy sailing. It's not going to be clear sailing. He's bound to come up with some tough opposition. Once I'd done the paperwork, the rest was easy sailing. Note: `Plain sailing' is sailing in good conditions, without any difficulties. However, the expression may have come from `plane sailing', a method of working out the position of a ship and planning its route using calculations based on the earth being flat rather than round. This is a simple and easy method which is fairly accurate over short distances, especially near the equator.
See also: plain, sailing

pure and simple

mod. basically; essentially. Bart is a crook, pure and simple.
See also: and, pure, simple
References in periodicals archive ?
2 -- color) Below, when Eloy Rivera bought his 1989 Honda Accord DX it was the plainest model offered and didn't come with air conditioning.
These verses lay out in the plainest possible terms how God brought his very nature to bear on the future of the entire cosmos.
Worth sipping on the rocks, and probably wasted in mixed drinks except for the plainest (dry vermouth only) Vodka Martini.
It is Kingsolver's gift to explain, in the plainest terms, the mechanisms of the human heart.
Tom Crone, the legal manager of News International, publishers of the News of the World, formally told him so in the plainest of terms today.
JAMIE'S unconvincing heartbreak - played out over nauseous backing music - as the soap's plainest teenager gave him the elbow.
Curly-haired Driver said Britain had some of the plainest actors in the world and, although she later denied her comments about Dame Judi, the 67-year-old actress might have felt she needed an image change.
Many consumers buy the plainest pattern to go with anything," he said, adding that such patterns as Windsor or Wilton perform well for his company.
But it is in the plainest sense of the phrase that Judd lifts himself completely above the better critics of his time.
On her own she decided to use the plainest unperfumed dish detergent she could find and followed that with a vinegar rinse.
I have exposed & denounced in the plainest possible terms the action of the scoundrel who produced the `Fake,' and who imposed his fabrication upon Mr.
This gives us more Norah, in the plainest way, one phrase toppling on to the next ("on top of which") awkwardly and authentically.
In its plainest form, this knot has three crossings.
16) See, among other examples, how Christ reviles classical oratory and its complexity in Paradise Regained, preferring instead the "majestic unaffected style" of the Hebrew prophets to "all the Oratory of Greece and Rome," asserting that in scripture lies a simple and accessible truth: "In them is plainest taught, and easiest learnt" (IV.
The court found that the buyer "in the plainest language announced and stipulated that it is not relying on any representations as to the very matter as to which it now claims it was defrauded.