plague

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a plague on both your houses

I hope that bad things happen to both of you (and your families). The phrase appears in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. I can't believe the two of you would deceive me like this! A plague on both your houses!
See also: both, house, on, plague

avoid (someone or something) like the plague

To consciously stay away from someone or something. I didn't do my homework my last night, so I'm avoiding my teacher like the plague. My dog is terrified of cats and avoids them like the plague.
See also: avoid, like, plague

enough to plague a saint

So trying or frustrating as to bother even the most patient person. The annoying action can be stated between "enough" and "to." Being with screaming kids all day is enough to plague a saint. The kids have really let loose today with enough shrieking to plague a saint.
See also: enough, plague, saint

avoid someone or something like the plague

Fig. to ignore or keep away from someone or something totally. What's wrong with Bob? Everyone avoids him like the plague. I don't like opera. I avoid it like the plague.
See also: avoid, like, plague

enough something to plague a saint

 and something is enough to plague a saint
Rur. enough of something to annoy even a patient person. That little boy has enough curiosity to plague a saint! Sally's a well-meaning woman, but her endless gossiping is enough to plague a saint.
See also: enough, plague, saint

plague someone or something with something

to bother or annoy someone or something with something. Stop plaguing me with your requests. We plagued the committee with ideas.
See also: plague

avoid like the plague

Evade or elude at any cost, shun. For example, Since Bob was taken into police custody, his friends have been avoiding him and his family like the plague . This seemingly modern expression dates from the Latin of the early Middle Ages, when Saint Jerome (a.d. 345-420) wrote, "Avoid, as you would the plague, a clergyman who is also a man of business." The plague, a deadly infectious disease in his day, has been largely wiped out, but the term remains current.
See also: avoid, like, plague

avoid someone/something like the plague

If you avoid someone or something like the plague, you do everything possible to avoid them. I would avoid him like the plague when his wife was around. The athlete must avoid all extra sugar like the plague. Note: The plague is bubonic plague, a disease which killed over 50 million people in Europe and Asia during the 14th century and was referred to as the Black Death.
See also: avoid, like, plague, something

avoid somebody/something like the ˈplague

(informal) avoid somebody/something completely: It was the sort of restaurant that I would normally have avoided like the plague.
A plague is an infectious disease that kills a lot of people.

plague with

v.
To pester, trouble, or harass someone or something with something: Reporters plague me with questions everywhere I go. The production was plagued with problems from the start.
See also: plague
References in classic literature ?
if he had n't plagued us so, we should have had a nice time.
Of course, the other lads made great fun of the whole thing, and plagued Dr.
During our stay at Port Famine, the Fuegians twice came and plagued us.
As I have no estate, I am plagued with no tenants or stewards: my annuity is paid me pretty regularly, as indeed it ought to be; for it is much less than what I might have expected in return for what I gave up.
I have really been plagued to death since I got here with interviewers, and that sort of person.
In past times when my wife plagued me; in present times when I have had a drop too much--ROBINSON CRUSOE.
I was plagued at Ipswich with the custom-house officers, who stopped my trunk, as I called it, and would open and search it.
So gaunt and haggard had he grown at last, that his wooden leg showed disproportionate, and presented a thriving appearance in contrast with the rest of his plagued body, which might almost have been termed chubby.