place (someone or something) at (some place)

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place (someone or something) at (some place)

1. To set or assign someone or something at a particular location. Please put each guest's name tag at their seat at the table. They placed two police officers at the door to his hospital room so that he couldn't escape.
2. To establish, determine, or discover that someone or something was present at a particular location and (typically) a particular time. Based on the evidence, we can place Mr. and Mrs. Smith at the exhibit around 9 PM. The liquid on the computer matches the sample taken from the crime scene, so we can definitely place it there at some point yesterday.
3. To indicate, evidence, or prove that someone or something was present at a particular location and (typically) a particular time. The paint on our suspect's shoes place him at the scene of the crime just before the murder took place. Just make sure you don't leave anything behind that places your car at the warehouse between those hours.
See also: place

place someone or something at something

 
1. to put someone or something somewhere. The king placed extra guards at the door for the night. I placed the wine bottle at the left of the host.
2. to figure that someone or something was in a certain place. The detective placed Randy at the scene of the crime about midnight. I place the getaway car at the first tollbooth at dawn.
See also: place
References in periodicals archive ?
'The PH government needs to place someone at a more local level where these people have direct access,' she said, indicating that the ruling coalition was too urban-centric.
Since normal copper metabolism is important for eye health, future research may focus on whether copper deficiency could place someone at higher risk for nearsightedness.
"For instance a third of North Easterners believe that it's acceptable for a woman to drink two glasses of wine five nights a week, when in fact, over time this kind of consumption would place someone at a higher risk of a range of cancers, stroke or heart attack."
DNA typing used as evidence to place someone at a murder scene "is very similar to what we do," Bannon says.