pity

(redirected from pityingly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

drown in self-pity

To be entirely consumed by sorrow, self-deprecation, or other negative emotions to the point of self-indulgence and/or paralysis. It's hard to help someone who would rather drown in self-pity than find a solution to their problems.
See also: drown

for pity's sake

A mild oath of surprise, exasperation, annoyance, frustration, or anger. For pity's sake! I haven't seen you in years! Would you let me finish my story, for pity's sake? Oh for pity's sake, I just had the car fixed and now you've put a dent in it!
See also: sake

for Pete's sake

A mild oath of surprise, exasperation, annoyance, frustration, or anger. For Pete's sake! I haven't seen you in years! Would you let me finish my story, for Pete's sake? Oh for Pete's sake, I just had the car fixed and now you've put a dent in it!
See also: sake

have pity on (one)

To act compassionately or with sympathy toward someone. Please, have pity on me, I don't want to die! The three spirits taught Scrooge how to have pity on his fellow man.
See also: have, on, pity

take pity on (someone or something)

To feel sympathy or compassion toward someone or something. Oh, take pity on Bill—he's been sick all week. That's the only reason he's fallen behind in his work.
See also: on, pity, take

For Pete's sake!

 and For pity's sake!; For the love of Mike!; For goodness sake!; For gosh sake!; For heaven('s) sake!
a mild exclamation of surprise or shock. For Pete's sake! How've ya been? For pity's sake! Ask the man in out of the cold!

have pity on someone (or an animal)

to have compassion toward someone or an animal. Please! Have pity on us. Let us come in!
See also: have, on, pity

more's the pity

Fig. it is a great pity or shame; it is sad. (Sometimes with the.) Jack can't come, more's the pity. Jane had to leave early, more's the pity.
See also: pity

take pity (on someone or an animal)

to feel sorry for someone or an animal. We took pity on the hungry people and gave them some hot food. She took pity on the little dog and brought it in to get warm.
See also: pity, take

What a pity!

 and What a shame!
Fig. an expression of consolation meaning That's too bad. (Can also be used sarcastically.) Bill: I'm sorry to tell you that the cat died today. Mary: What a pity! Mary: The cake is ruined! Sally: What a shame!
See also: what

for Pete's sake

Also, for pity's sake. See for the sake of, def. 3.
See also: sake

for the sake of

1. Also for one's sake. Out of consideration or regard for a person or thing; for someone's or something's advantage or good. For example, For Jill's sake we did not serve meat, or We have to stop fighting for the sake of family unity. [Early 1200s]
2. For the purpose or motive of, as in You like to quarrel only for the sake of an argument. [Early 1200s]
3. for God's sake. Also for goodness or heaven's or Pete's or pity's sake . An exclamation showing surprise, impatience, anger, or some other emotion, depending on the context. For example, For God's sake, I didn't expect to see you here, or Hurry up, for goodness sake, or For heaven's sake, how can you say such a mean thing? or For pity's sake, finish your dinner. The variants are euphemisms for God. [c. 1300] For a synonym, see for the love of, def. 2.
See also: of, sake

take pity on

Also, have pity on. Show compassion or mercy to, as in Take pity on the cook and eat that last piece of cake, or, as Miles Coverdale's 1535 translation of the Bible has it (Job 19:21), "Have pity upon me, have pity upon me, O ye, my friends." This idiom may be used half-jokingly, as in the first example, or seriously. [Late 1200s]
See also: on, pity, take

more's the pity

If you add more's the pity to a comment, you are expressing your disappointment or regret about something. My world isn't your world, more's the pity. We've always lacked a written constitution, more's the pity.
See also: pity

more's the pity

used to express regret about a fact that has just been stated. informal
1994 Amstrad Action The full version of this game never got released. More's the pity, as if the demo's anything to go by, it would have been a stormer.
See also: pity

for ˌPete’s ˈsake

(British English) used to emphasize that it is important to do something, or when you are annoyed or impatient about something: For Pete’s sake, what are you doing in that bathroom? You’ve been in there for nearly an hour.
See also: sake

ˌmore’s the ˈpity

(British English, informal) unfortunately: He can’t read and he doesn’t want to learn, more’s the pity.
See also: pity

for God’s, heaven’s, pity’s, etc. ˈsake

used to emphasize that it is important to do something; used to show that you are annoyed about something: For God’s sake try and control yourself!Do be careful, for goodness’ sake.Oh, for heaven’s sake!(Some people find the use of God here offensive.)
See also: sake

For Pete’s sake!

and For pity’s sake! and For the love of Mike!
exclam. Good grief! For Pete’s sake! Is that you Charlie? For pity’s sake! Ask the man in out of the cold!

For pity’s sake!

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Shelooked pityingly at me,and added: ``Toget a handle on this, you have to bean art critic.
wishers looking at him pityingly and mouthing "bad luck" but here's hoping he puts up a good show.
To smile pityingly, as if Mills and Boon had written the script but left the casting to Hammer House of Horrors.
The boys were horrified and I have to say I didn't like it - I felt like a fraud when people looked at me pityingly as though I was ill.
Teenage daughters, I can see, are looking at me pityingly - that my life has come to this, being so het up and in a mither about the frigging rubbish - they are mentally taking it all in, mentally storing it away for when they are older, so that they can avoid such a tragic obsession.
In today's post- feminist society, clever and confident women are more likely to laugh pityingly at men's need to stare at silly photographs like these, than they are to feel threatened by them.
So powerful and addictive is this energy field that it redraws a person's cognitive map of sacred places: "The Bowery will be his romance, Broadway his lyric, and the Park his pastoral, the river and glory of it all his epic, and he will look down pityingly on all the rest of humanity" (47).
Pityingly, she looked across the pillow and said: "Sorry, I didn't want to tell you earlier, but I came off one on the gallops yesterday and cracked four ribs
They are fully aware of how close to power they are and speak pityingly of MPs, who went through all the hard work of being elected for comparatively little reward.
I was already aware of people pointing at her pityingly when we were outside.
Matthew looked on pityingly, applauding (possibly with some sarcasm) when I achieved 46%.
Teenage daughters, I can see, are looking at me pityingly ( that my life has come to this, being so het up and in a mither about the frigging rubbish ( they are mentally taking it all in, mentally storing it away for when they are older, so that they can avoid such a tragic obsession.
Having spent the week cocooned in five-star luxury he talks self pityingly of trying to get over the trauma of the night Stuart, drugged and sexually abused was found dead in his swimming pool.
Asked whether some autumn winner would be going to Cheltenham, he would look pityingly at his inquisitor and reply: "God knows, the Chinese could be here by then.