pity

(redirected from pityingly)
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drown in self-pity

To be entirely consumed by sorrow, self-deprecation, or other negative emotions to the point of self-indulgence and/or paralysis. It's hard to help someone who would rather drown in self-pity than find a solution to their problems.
See also: drown

for God's sake

An oath of exasperation, annoyance, frustration, anger, or surprise. Would you let me finish my story, for God's sake? Oh for God's sake, I just had the car fixed and now you've put a dent in it! For God's sake! I haven't seen you in years!
See also: sake

for heaven's sake

A mild oath of surprise, exasperation, annoyance, frustration, or anger. For heaven's sake! I haven't seen you in years! Would you let me finish my story, for heaven's sake? Oh for heaven's sake, I just had the car fixed and now you've put a dent in it!
See also: sake

for Pete's sake

A mild oath of exasperation, annoyance, frustration, anger, or surprise. Would you let me finish my story, for Pete's sake? Oh for Pete's sake, I just had the car fixed and now you've put a dent in it! For Pete's sake! I haven't seen you in years!
See also: sake

for pity's sake

A mild oath of surprise, exasperation, annoyance, frustration, or anger. For pity's sake! I haven't seen you in years! Would you let me finish my story, for pity's sake? Oh for pity's sake, I just had the car fixed and now you've put a dent in it!
See also: sake

have pity on (one)

To act compassionately or with sympathy toward one. Please, have pity on me, I don't want to die! The three spirits taught Scrooge how to have pity on his fellow man.
See also: have, on, pity

more's the pity

old-fashioned That is regretful and disappointing; it's a shame. A: "Looks like Aunt Leanne and her kids won't be coming tonight." B: "More's the pity, and I made all this extra food for them, too."
See also: pity

take pity on (someone or something)

To treat someone or something kindly due to feeling sympathy or compassion toward them, especially because of their misfortune or suffering. Oh, take pity on Bill—he's been sick all week. That's the only reason he's fallen behind in his work. The king took pity on the old beggar, who turned out to be a wizard.
See also: on, pity, take

that's a pity

That is really unfortunate; that's too bad. Can be used sarcastically. A: "Tom and I broke up yesterday." B: "Aw, that's a pity! You two were such a cute couple!" A: "I'm sorry, but I have decided not to accept your offer." B: "That's a pity. We really thought you were the perfect person for the role." I guess he decided to delete his account from the forum. That's a pity—I'm sure we'll all miss his inane observations.
See also: pity

what a pity

That is really unfortunate; that's too bad. Can be used sarcastically. A: "Tom and I broke up yesterday." B: "Aw, what a pity! You two were such a cute couple!" A: "I'm sorry, but I have decided not to accept your offer." B: "What a pity. We really thought you were the perfect person for the role." I guess he decided to delete his account from the forum. What a pity—I'm sure we'll all miss his inane observations.
See also: pity, what

For Pete's sake!

 and For pity's sake!; For the love of Mike!; For goodness sake!; For gosh sake!; For heaven('s) sake!
a mild exclamation of surprise or shock. For Pete's sake! How've ya been? For pity's sake! Ask the man in out of the cold!

have pity on someone (or an animal)

to have compassion toward someone or an animal. Please! Have pity on us. Let us come in!
See also: have, on, pity

more's the pity

Fig. it is a great pity or shame; it is sad. (Sometimes with the.) Jack can't come, more's the pity. Jane had to leave early, more's the pity.
See also: pity

take pity (on someone or an animal)

to feel sorry for someone or an animal. We took pity on the hungry people and gave them some hot food. She took pity on the little dog and brought it in to get warm.
See also: pity, take

What a pity!

 and What a shame!
Fig. an expression of consolation meaning That's too bad. (Can also be used sarcastically.) Bill: I'm sorry to tell you that the cat died today. Mary: What a pity! Mary: The cake is ruined! Sally: What a shame!
See also: what

for God's sake

Also, for goodness sake. See for the sake of, def. 3.
See also: sake

for Pete's sake

Also, for pity's sake. See for the sake of, def. 3.
See also: sake

for the sake of

1. Also for one's sake. Out of consideration or regard for a person or thing; for someone's or something's advantage or good. For example, For Jill's sake we did not serve meat, or We have to stop fighting for the sake of family unity. [Early 1200s]
2. For the purpose or motive of, as in You like to quarrel only for the sake of an argument. [Early 1200s]
3. for God's sake. Also for goodness or heaven's or Pete's or pity's sake . An exclamation showing surprise, impatience, anger, or some other emotion, depending on the context. For example, For God's sake, I didn't expect to see you here, or Hurry up, for goodness sake, or For heaven's sake, how can you say such a mean thing? or For pity's sake, finish your dinner. The variants are euphemisms for God. [c. 1300] For a synonym, see for the love of, def. 2.
See also: of, sake

take pity on

Also, have pity on. Show compassion or mercy to, as in Take pity on the cook and eat that last piece of cake, or, as Miles Coverdale's 1535 translation of the Bible has it (Job 19:21), "Have pity upon me, have pity upon me, O ye, my friends." This idiom may be used half-jokingly, as in the first example, or seriously. [Late 1200s]
See also: on, pity, take

more's the pity

If you add more's the pity to a comment, you are expressing your disappointment or regret about something. My world isn't your world, more's the pity. We've always lacked a written constitution, more's the pity.
See also: pity

more's the pity

used to express regret about a fact that has just been stated. informal
1994 Amstrad Action The full version of this game never got released. More's the pity, as if the demo's anything to go by, it would have been a stormer.
See also: pity

for ˌPete’s ˈsake

(British English) used to emphasize that it is important to do something, or when you are annoyed or impatient about something: For Pete’s sake, what are you doing in that bathroom? You’ve been in there for nearly an hour.
See also: sake

ˌmore’s the ˈpity

(British English, informal) unfortunately: He can’t read and he doesn’t want to learn, more’s the pity.
See also: pity

for God’s, heaven’s, pity’s, etc. ˈsake

used to emphasize that it is important to do something; used to show that you are annoyed about something: For God’s sake try and control yourself!Do be careful, for goodness’ sake.Oh, for heaven’s sake!(Some people find the use of God here offensive.)
See also: sake

For Pete’s sake!

and For pity’s sake! and For the love of Mike!
exclam. Good grief! For Pete’s sake! Is that you Charlie? For pity’s sake! Ask the man in out of the cold!

For pity’s sake!

verb

for heaven's/Pete's/pity's sake

An expression of surprise, emphasis, exasperation, outrage, and so forth. These all are euphemisms for “for God’s sake,” which in some circles is considered blasphemous. “For heaven’s sake” dates at least from the nineteenth century. “For Pete’s sake” appeared in Dialect Notes in 1924. “For pity’s sake” dates from the sixteenth century; Michael Drayton used it in one of his Idea sonnets of 1593: “Rebate thy spleen, if but for pities sake!” See also for the love of Mike/Pete/God.
See also: sake
References in periodicals archive ?
Acker doesn't scowl or retort; she just examines her interlocutor pityingly, as if she were some unknown species that hasn't been screwed enough.
It's unusual for a Chinese restaurant to offer Western cutlery right off the bat; normally diners have to do that thing where they mumble apologetically to a waiter about their lack of tableware dexterity until a fork is brought pityingly to the table.
Now with a beautiful, aristocratic wife and two adorable, photogenic children to his credit, Bernstein needed only to refer pityingly to Mitropoulos's "sweet, relaxed relationship" with the Philharmonic and its putative result in "the men taking advantage of him" or to suggest that the orchestra would be better off with a married man, a family man, at its helm--both of which he reportedly did for several years leading up to Mitropoulos's dismissal--to feed the already corrosive homophobia that appears as a significant factor in the humiliating fall that crushed Mitropoulos's career (and may have hastened his death).
'You've heard of Jack and Jill haven't you' said Anthony severely 'Of course' said Jacqueline, 'is this he?' 'No' said Anthony pityingly, 'This is Jack and Dill', I thought everyone knew that') I sent a message to the Jug, I told him not to be a mug I said he must be badly cracked To think of joining Hitler's pact The Jug replied: 'But don't you see How difficult it is for me' ('It's difficult for me too', said Jacqueline sadly.
[The moon] seemed to hover pityingly over Vera's pillow, softening the proud lines of the white face, resting upon it, and turning to silver the golden hair.
Yet scholars have been slow to see their singularities as quite as essential to the pantheon as Pope's snap and crackle or Swift's hard insistences or Blake's unreservedly searching judgements, and reluctant to admit how Wordsworth and Coleridge were so belated in idealizing what Fergusson and Burns had done, and how keenly and pityingly Keats recognized that.
One day while scanning the sea with my bins for magnificent frigatebirds and boobies (no tittering at the back there), a concerned Rasta memorably approached me to enquire if I'd lost my boat - he looked at me pityingly when I explained I was looking for birds, not boats.
'No cara', Nonna says shaking her head pityingly. 'Jiff is no chemical'?
"You are a parrot for the party," Uncle Dave said pityingly. "For months, we hear nothing from Fefer.
After all, one might argue that Ford's playtext is implicated in the same acts of reinscription it so pityingly and frighteningly depicts.
And then she looked pityingly at me, and added: 'To get a handle on this, you have to be an art critic.'
Edward Herman, in a recent cyber-anathema, expels me because I am "rushing toward the vital center, maybe further to the right, with termination point still to be determined." He states pityingly that I apparently "cannot understand that attacking supposed rationalizations for X may be de facto rationalizing for Y." I must say I think that last bit is a touch obvious.
When Katherine Anne Porter finally published "Ship of Fools one critic pityingly called her an "unregenerate short story writer," because the characters in it did not grow.
Janet smiled pityingly and tried to explain the form: "It's quite simple, really.