pissant


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pissant

1. adjective Completely worthless; too small, trivial, or unimportant to care about. Nearly 50 years of loyal service, and the only thing they give me when I retire is this pissant watch. It isn't even a Rolex! Some pissant company is trying to sue us over patent infringement. Don't they know who we are?
2. Someone who is utterly worthless, unimportant, or reprehensible. If you think I'm going to take orders from a pissant like you, you've got another think coming! I can't believe they hired that pissant to coach the team!

pissant

and piss-ant
1. n. a wretched and worthless person. (Often objectionable.) Look, you silly pissant, beat it!
2. mod. worthless. (Often objectionable.) I don’t want this little pissant piece of pie. Give me a real piece.

piss-ant

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Quant a la belle et enlgmatlque Diane de la Panne, le narrateur fait sa connaissance au bord d'un marigot, en tete a tete avec une montagne de bagages "sous laquelle sa Chrysler avait rendu l'ame, le pont arriere effondre pissant une huile noire" (76).
At the far left perimeter was a clearing packed with rides, and the pissant menagerie was situated at the front, under a colonnade of live oaks.
Homosexuals are men who in fifteen years of trying cannot get a pissant antidiscrimination bill through City Council.
American dollars and lives would not be wasted on "pissant" countries.
"'No more guts than a pissant.' It's too late for him to reverse."
Joe DIRT says "DEER-tay," and undercover agent PISSANT says "pee-SANH." Fred Crane points out an earlier example from the movies.
In anger, he further dubbed The AD as The American Pissant, National Enquirer and even Glamour Magazine, noting how "no one responds to your antics ..." and "simply pissing everyone off bullying them into printing your essays or you will harass them." If the truth hurts, label it "antics" and "bullying." Has the wave of politically correct self-esteem building weakened "everyone" to the point where words elicit tears?
Your best friend faces indictment by a zealous independent counsel on a pissant charge.
no weight training, no trips to the sawbones for a pissant
In the first movie, Joe Dirt, Joe says his last name is pronounced "DEER-tay." In the second movie, Corky Romano, Corky uses an undercover name, PISSANT, which everyone pronounces as PISS ANT.
The resulting tumult would stand a strong chance of dividing Republicans, pushing many Democrats into opposition and proving, in the end, a political disaster for President Bush-as was the case for Lyndon Johnson, the last President to stake his career on a quick win against "a pissant little country." Johnson stared himself blind at that famous light at the end of the tunnel.
Attorney cited his already heavy caseload and asked, "When am I supposed to do these pissant drug cases?" These prosecutors say drug cases are so common now that they rarely pursue those involving less than two kilograms of cocaine.
(10) See Robin Creyke, 'The Impact of Judicial Review on Tribunals--Recent Developments' (Paper presented at the Fifth Annual AIJA Tribunals Conference, Melbourne, 6-7 June 2002); Robin Creyke and John McMillan, Control of Government Action: Text, Cases and Commentary (LexisNexis Butterworths, 2nd ed, 2009) 986-9; Mark Aronson, Bruce Dyer and Matthew Groves, Judicial Review of Administrative Action (Lawbook, 4th ed, 2009) 296-305; Roger Douglas, Douglas and Jones's Administrative Law (Federation Press, 5th ed, 2006) 466-71; Vincenzo Salvatore Paparo, 'Review of Collegiate Decisions: Judicial Protection for "Pissants'" (2005) 47 AIAL Forum 65, 70-1.