pique

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in a pique

slang Annoyed or indignant, typically because one feels slighted or snubbed. Come on, don't get in a pique about what Alice said—I'm sure she didn't mean anything by it. Ugh, I forgot to invite Cal to my party, and he's in a pique about it.
See also: pique

pique (one's) (emotion)

To arouse a particular emotion in one. While the special effects looked impressive, it was the movie's approach to its female characters that piqued my interest. Nothing piques my ire like people who don't use their turn signals when they're driving! It's important to provide your children with experiences that pique their curiosity.
See also: pique

pique (one's) curiosity

To cause one to become interested in or inquisitive about something; to arouse one's curiosity. All right, you've piqued my curiosity. What is this "ingenious" invention of yours, and how exactly will it give me back hours of my life? It's important to provide your children with experiences that pique their curiosity and help foster an inquisitive mind.
See also: curiosity, pique

pique (one's) interest

To cause one to become interested in or captivated by something; to arouse one's interest. All right, you've piqued my interest. What is this "ingenious" invention of yours, and how exactly will it give me back hours of my life? It's important to provide your children with a variety of experiences to see what piques their interest. Not every kid is going to want to play baseball or do ballet.
See also: interest, pique

pit (someone or something) against (someone or something else)

To set someone or something into direct conflict, opposition, or competition against someone or something else. She liked pitting men against each other to vie for her affection. The country has pitted itself against the rest of the world with its plan to develop nuclear weapons.
See also: pit, something
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in a pique

Fig. having a feeling of resentment; feeling that one's pride has been hurt. In a real pique, Anne insulted all of her friends. John's found himself in a pique over Bob's harsh criticism.
See also: pique

pique someone's curiosity

 and pique someone's interest
to arouse interest; to arouse curiosity. The advertisement piqued my curiosity about the product. The professor tried to pique the students' interest in French literature.
See also: curiosity, pique
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ˌpique somebody’s ˈinterest, curiˈosity, etc.

(especially American English) make somebody very interested in something: The programme has certainly piqued public interest in this rare bird.
See also: pique
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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